APA Digital Coast Needs Assessment Survey

Needs: Tools


The total data are summarized below. Click on a region for specific regional data:

TABLE 5a.

Importance of Tools for Respondents' planning practice/analysis/research (Question #14)b

TOOL Very High High Neutral Low Very Low NAa TOTAL
# % # % # % # % # % # % # %
Airborne LIDAR Data Process & Anal. 200 29 133 19 112 16 52 8 56 8 134 20 687 100
Benthic Terrain Modeler 50 7 71 10 143 21 101 15 132 19 190 28 687 100
C-CAP Land Cover Atlas 159 23 188 27 152 22 54 8 45 7 89 13 687 100
CanVis Visual Simulation 169 25 198 29 149 22 51 7 37 5 83 12 687 100
Chart Reprojector 48 7 87 13 143 21 106 15 125 18 178 26 687 100
Coastal County Snapshots 231 34 193 28 133 19 42 6 30 4 58 8 687 100
Cumulative Impacts Model 155 23 182 26 127 18 63 9 58 8 102 15 687 100
Digital Shoreline Analysis System 158 23 201 29 137 20 56 8 52 8 83 12 687 100
eCoastal Tools 80 12 137 20 166 24 94 14 80 12 130 19 687 100
Electronic Navigational Chart Handler 34 5 68 10 105 15 123 18 156 23 201 29 687 100
Essential Fish Habitat Mapper 85 12 114 17 138 20 109 16 99 14 142 21 687 100
FUSION 135 20 152 22 121 18 78 11 61 9 140 20 687 100
Habitat Priority Planner 179 26 185 27 137 20 73 11 39 6 74 11 687 100
Hazard Assessment Template 167 24 167 24 163 24 66 10 71 10 53 8 687 100
Hazards US Multi-Hazard HAZUS-MH 201 29 177 26 142 21 57 8 41 6 69 10 687 100
Historical Hurricane Tracks IMS 81 12 95 14 111 16 87 13 109 16 204 30 687 100
Impervious Surface Analysis Tool 287 42 186 27 110 16 40 6 19 3 45 7 687 100
Landscape Fragmentation Tool 194 28 179 26 146 21 65 9 33 5 70 10 687 100
Legislative Atlas 99 14 116 17 171 25 109 16 75 11 117 17 687 100
Lidar Data Handler 178 26 134 20 120 17 66 10 51 7 138 20 687 100
MarineMap 53 8 85 12 133 19 120 17 120 17 176 26 687 100
Marxan with Zones 62 9 134 20 189 28 104 15 69 10 129 19 687 100
Multi-Purpose Marine Cadastre 52 8 74 11 133 19 121 18 119 17 188 27 687 100
Nautical Chart Viewer 44 6 64 9 113 16 120 17 142 21 204 30 687 100
Nonpt-Source Pollute & Ersn Compare 197 29 180 26 143 21 67 10 42 6 58 8 687 100
Pract Toolkit Marine Consv Agreemnts 43 6 76 11 116 17 125 18 143 21 184 27 687 100
Sea Level Affecting Marshes Model 123 18 143 21 121 18 79 11 86 13 135 20 687 100
Sea Lev Rise & Coast Flood Freq View 178 26 144 21 119 17 71 10 67 10 108 16 687 100
Soil Data Viewer 122 18 183 27 164 24 92 13 56 8 70 10 687 100
Spatial Trends Coast Socioecon Quick 123 18 184 27 172 25 72 10 53 8 83 12 687 100
Storm Data Resource Guide 96 14 121 18 170 25 105 15 93 14 102 15 687 100
Storm Mapping Tutorial 95 14 136 20 144 21 105 15 99 14 108 16 687 100
Topograph & Bathym Data Inventory 124 18 170 25 148 22 101 15 58 8 86 13 687 100
US Marine Protected Area Online Map 64 9 102 15 138 20 113 16 113 16 157 23 687 100
Vdatum 112 16 128 19 163 24 78 11 76 11 130 19 687 100
Wave Exposure Model 95 14 114 17 128 19 66 10 107 16 177 26 687 100

a. Not Applicable

b. Responses to Question #15 (What other coastal decision support tools (including models) would improve your planning practice/analysis/research?) are provided at the end of this page.


Table 5a lists 36 tools for which respondents were asked to rate their importance for planning practice, analysis, and research. The six tools (two tied for #5) with the highest percentage of very high or high importance ratings from respondents are:


The six tools (two tied for #5) with the highest percentage of low or very low importance ratings from respondents are:

  • Electronic Navigational Chart Handler 7 (41%);
  • Practitioner's Toolkit for Marine Conservation Agreements 8 (39%);
  • Nautical Chart Viewer 9 (38%);
  • Multi-Purpose Marine Cadastre 10 (35%);
  • Benthic Terrain Modeler 11 (34%); and
  • MarineMap 12 (34% each).

The six tools (two tied for #5) with the highest percentage of respondents rating the tool as "Not Applicable" are:

  • Historical Hurricane Tracks IMS (30%) (Historical Hurricane Tracks IMS enables viewers to find tropical cyclone data in the Atlantic and Eastern Pacific basins);
  • Nautical Chart Viewer (30% each);
  • Electronic Navigational Chart Handler (29%);
  • Benthic Terrain Modeler (28%);
  • Multi-Purpose Marine Cadastre (27%); and
  • Practitioner's Toolkit for Marine Conservation Agreements (27%).

What Planners Need: Tools Top Five Ranked by % of Respondents Citing High or Very High Importance

  1. Impervious Surface Analysis Tool (69%)
  2. Coastal County Snapshots (62%)
  3. Hazards U.S. Multi-Hazard (HAZUS-MH) (55%)
  4. Nonpoint-Source Pollution & Erosion Comparison Tool (55%)
  5. Landscape Fragmentation Tool (54%)       

What other coastal decision support tools (including models) would improve your planning practice/analysis/research? (Question #15 — 67 free responses)

  • TOOLS
    • migratory bird habitat evaluation tsunami hazard escape route planning
    • Indigenous council circles, where it takes as long as it takes to reach a decision, and people are given the time and space to speak as long as they must in order to reach a decision. Talking sticks are a good tool for this model.
    • water quality model keyed to TMDL nutrient and sediment limits.
    • Lidar data resolution is important. Ground-based Lidar data?
    • 1. Something that links soils to earthquakes so that liquifaction areas can be identified. 2. Something that shows how California's implementation of NPDES (hyrdomodification requirements) has caused a shortage of fine sands from the mountains reaching the beaches (causing the need for beach replacement projects).
    • Updated air photos
    • transportation models
    • litorial drift model sediment transport model current model for Puget Sound nutrient & temperature mixing model for PS acidification model for PS marine habitat projection model for protection
    • Information about pollution sources and coastal industries
    • littoral drift along marine shorelines
    • Aquifer and water recharge data/analysis
    • Coastal erosion and siltation trends and rates as regards harbors and channels.
    • storm surge models evacuation planning tools
    • Regular bathymetric and benthic data in the Puget Sound (annual data sets would be EXCELLENT).
    • time-model projection maps of sea level rise by very small increments.
    • Habitat migration form sea level rise model.
    • locates specific marine uses such as docks, houseboats, types of fishing, recreation areas, etc. along coastline up to and beyound high tide
    • capital risk assessment of consequences of coastal roadway and/or bridge failures
    • Coast bluff erosion calculators- estimate current rate of erosion and project future rates.
    • Agricultural economic sustainability models (e.g. critical mass of ag land needed to support local ag industry). Model to divide TMDL pollution load reduction responsibility among land/facility owners/managers. Model to measure and predict the impact of precipitation event patterns on coastal habitats (e.g. submerged aquatic grasses).
    • Two-foot or better contours. (Existing USGS contours in this area do not meet current specifications for the 10-foot contours shown.
  • NOT APPLICABLE (4)
  • NOT SURE/DO NOT KNOW (6)
  • NONE/INCLUDED ABOVE (20)
  • NON-TOPICAL COMMENTARY
    • All systems listed vary in priority depending university researcher and which project. They all appear to have high priority depending on the user. Answers are based only on current projects within our program.
    • Not everyone in California smells the salt air or practices on the coast.
    • Many of the above sound potentially useful for our work in land use planning, but we would need training to be able to use them.
    • The county I work for is 120 miles west of the Chesapeake Bay and 600 feet above sea level, so we have no direct interest in coastal issues.
    • This is a good sales pitch...set them up with all of the above. Talk to Bill Ingersoll and the WC GIS lab.
    • All these would improve our analysis if we had the time and staff to use them as well as the political will to consider them in long range planning. It is important to note that staff's desire for tools is likely different than elected officials who may not understand the data and how it can be used in long range planning.
    • Work with data not software applications.
    • In preparing community plans, I may do some fresh research, but mostly depend on the engineering and environmental reports and data of professionals in those fields.
    • * "not applicable" answers above indicate I didn't understand what the tool does.
    • From the DoD perspective, it is important for the local jurisdictions to understand the military mission within our coastal areas.
    • I filled these out based on what I "think" might be important, but I don't use ANY of these tools in my practice so don't feel qualified to say.
    • While the Digital Coast provides all of these tools, I work in coastal management using GIS and I have not been exposed to all of the useful tools. We need more training opportunities on the state or regional level. If the state can't generate the analysis and use these tools, then these tools become obsolete unless the analysis is done on the federal level.
    • Comment: just because something is "not applicable" to my practice doesn't mean I don't think it's important.
  • SURVEY CRITIQUE
    • this survey is too long.

Endnotes

1. Historical Hurricane Tracks IMS enables viewers to find tropical cyclone data in the Atlantic and Eastern Pacific basins.

2. The Impervious Surface Analysis Tool calculates the percentage of impervious surfaces for a selected geographic area.

3. Coastal County Snapshots provide local officials with a quick look at a county's demographics, infrastructure, and environment within the flood zone.

Hazards U.S. Multi-Hazard (HAZUS-MH) analyzes risks and potential losses from floods, hurricane winds, and earthquakes.

4. The Nonpoint-Source Pollution and Erosion Comparison Tool examines land cover to measure runoff, nonpoint source pollution, and erosion.

5. The CanVis Visual Simulation Tool enables users to add objects to images in order to visualize impacts of the future.

6. The Landscape Fragmentation Tool maps the type of fragmentation present in a specified land cover feature and produces a data set containing results.

7. The Electronic Navigational Chart Handler provides the ability to simplify the use of electronic navigational charts.

8. The Practitioner's Toolkit for Marine Conservation Agreements offers guidance on how to develop and implement a marine conservation agreement project.

9. The Nautical Chart Viewer permits viewers to bring BSB-formatted nautical chart information into a GIS.

10. The Multi-Purpose Marine Cadastre supplies baseline information needed for marine spatial planning efforts.

11. The Benthic Terrain Modeler derives benthic terrain classifications from input bathymetry.

12. MarineMap assists in the design of marine protected areas.