Tuesdays at APA–Chicago — October 2013

The Speculative City

October 22, 2013

Despite the planning profession's origins in visionary thinking about the future of our cities, many contemporary planning practitioners are mired in the political battles of today and, therefore, can feel disconnected from the idea of imagining how the cities of tomorrow may have different needs and functions than the cities of today.

According to architect and urban designer Marshall Brown, from the Illinois Institute of Technology, future cities will be rooted in but not beholden to current realities. The cities of the future will likely be "mash-ups," recombining and repurposing infrastructure and design features.

Brown discussed his recent projects, including proposals for reimaging Chicago's Circle Center, and shared ideas about American cities and their futures.

PDF of PowerPoint presentation (pdf)

About the Speaker

Marshall BrownMarshall Brown is an architect, urban designer, principal of Marshall Brown Projects, and director of the Master of Landscape Architecture program at Illinois Institute of Technology. His practice has worked on several projects in Chicago, including Navy Pier redevelopment and a master plan for the Washington Park neighborhood. Brown recently founded the urbanism, art, and culture think tank NEW PROJECTS in collaboration with curator Stephanie Smith. He is on the editorial board of the Journal of Architectural Education, and his projects and essays have appeared in several books and journals.