2019 National Planning Conference

Posters

The Exhibit Hall is the place to discover poster displays of exciting projects undertaken by talented planners at all levels of experience. Posters are on display Saturday through Monday of the conference.

Student and professional practice posters are entered into a competition. APA will announce the winners during the Exhibit Hall Happy Hour on Monday night.

Visit the Posters Onsite

Browse the posters below, organized by track, to get a glimpse of what will be presented onsite in San Francisco.

Academic and Professional Research

A Community-Based Approach to Surface-Water Resiliency

What You'll Learn

  • Recognize how place-based, low-cost surface-water management strategies can uplift a distressed community through also addressing other urban socio-economic and environmental issues.
  • Reshape current perspectives and approaches to surface-water management, shifting from the traditional "mono-disciplinary" engineering alternatives to a multi-participatory collaboration regarding the complex network of urban issues.
  • Reflect on addressing surface-water issues for most urban contexts in the Global South in a manner that creates a water-resilient community and retains an urban identity.

More Poster Details

A Community-Based Approach to Surface-Water Resiliency focuses on a collection of socially vulnerable, small-scale community watersheds within the North Memphis neighborhood that are prone to flooding. Through integrating scientific and applied technical knowledge (i.e., meteorology of extreme events and future change as well as rainfall-runoff processes and modeling in cities) with the neighborhood planning process (i.e., community awareness and involvement), this research demonstrates the potential of water-based ecosystem services uplifting this distressed community through providing multiple socio-economic and environmental opportunities that promote community development.

Presenter

Aubrey Toldi

Next Gen's Desires for Washington's Future

What You'll Learn

  • Summarize the concerns and desires Washington's next generation has regarding future development in the state.
  • Compare the similarities and differences between responses based on participants' location in the state.
  • Replicate a similar study to collect input from college students about important issues facing their state.

More Poster Details

Washington state passed the Growth Management Act in 1990. The state legislature asked the William D. Ruckelshaus Center to review it. Through workshops and interviews, the center is asking stakeholders, professionals, and elected officials to assess how the GMA is working or not, to get perspectives on current issues facing different regions, and register their desires for Washington's future. To complement their work, Western Washington University students collected input from college students across the state, asking about their desires for Washington's future, issues they are concerned about, and actions that should be taken to preserve or enhance unique regional characteristics.

Presenter

Tamara Laninga
Andrew Graminski
Nicholas Schmeck
Brian Kirk

Renewable Energy Challenges: Keys to Development

What You'll Learn

  • Link natural areas on the landscape to ecosystem services and renewable energy generation, and optimize in order to respond to climate change.
  • Place values on ecosystem services related to increased renewable energy use to strengthen natural area planning.
  • Develop approaches to achieve social license to improve engagement with communities, Indigenous peoples, and other stakeholders in renewable energy development and climate change response.

More Poster Details

Natural areas on the landscape provide a variety of services that contribute to well-being for the planet. Using a Natural Heritage System approach to planning can better assess, protect, and optimize ecosystem services to respond to climate change. Researchers at a Canadian university are developing a quantitative tool to help planners identify, delineate, and protect natural areas on the landscape that recognize ecosystem services to respond to climate change. These researchers, part of the Renewable Energy and Development Implementation Lab, are also researching how increasing the proportion of renewable energy will address our GHG emission target to combat climate change.

Presenter

Carolyn DeLoyde

Bay Area Deprivation and Regeneration Study

What You'll Learn

  • In the nine-county Bay Area, identify the neighborhoods that are economically deprived and the various factors that contributed to the deprivation.
  • Recognize the impact that economic and environmental inequality and segregation has on communities and identify factors at play.
  • Be more aware of the effect of planning decisions on equality and environmental justice.

More Poster Details

In the first part of the study, we compiled the Bay Area Indices of Economic Deprivation, which is modeled after the English Indices of Deprivation, to identify areas that are deprived in terms of income and employment, and underserved in terms of housing and services. The second half of the study overlays environmental, transportation, housing, job, and other data in order to find correlations that would point us to a set of strategies for the deprived areas. We will share our key findings of the study.

Presenter

Anne Chen

Design, Development, and Preservation

Historic Butler Street YMCA Repositioning Strategy

What You'll Learn

  • Learn the history of the Butler Street YMCA and its role in the Civil Rights Movement in Atlanta.
  • Understand the current challenges for revitalization, including it being a vacant structure within an underutilized city block that's surrounded by a rapidly growing neighborhood that has been ripe for investment.
  • Be mindful of a historical redevelopment that is engrained in Atlanta's urban fabric, alongside making economically feasible product recommendations that would benefit the building's owner and the Sweet Auburn neighborhood.

More Poster Details

For nearly 100 years, the Butler Street YMCA has stood as a fixture in Atlanta's historic Sweet Auburn neighborhood. The historic structure was the backbone of Atlanta's civil rights movement, housing notable people such as Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr., Rep. John Lewis, and the Hungry Club, a secret organization that promoted a dialogue for black and white community leaders. Today, the building lays dormant, with its potential being discussed as the Sweet Auburn neighborhood rapidly develops around it. The community is unified: it is time to reexamine and revitalize the Butler Street YMCA.

Presenter

Seth Furman
Melody Carter

The Toolkit That Redefines Neighborhood Preservation

What You'll Learn

  • Employ new vocabulary and definitions for communicating about historic preservation across broad audiences that don't typically engage with traditional preservation conversations.
  • Implement novel approaches for working with community members as paid project liaisons, helping reach broader audiences through honest conversations, and providing greater opportunities for agency and ownership of the work.
  • Understand the challenges that exist when engaging with community members about preservation due to differences in building fabric, understanding of policy, and socio-economic status, and apply this knowledge at home.

More Poster Details

Concurrent with the Philadelphia's Mayor's Task Force on Historic Preservation, PennPraxis led a six-month engagement process to develop a neighborhood preservation toolkit for all residents. Content was informed by intimate, candid neighborhood gatherings, organized by 20 community liaisons who were hired as project collaborators. The toolkit is organized by desired outcomes, as articulated by community members: e.g., "Strengthen and Sustain Neighborhood Commercial Corridors" or "Learn and Share my Neighborhood's History." Each section contains tips for getting involved, key information, and action steps, all written in accessible language that will inspire more Philadelphians to take a role in preserving their neighborhoods.

Presenter

Julie Donofrio

Cultivating Connections in the Mechanicsville Neighborhood

What You'll Learn

  • Define community benefit agreements.
  • Manage community expectations with developer demands.
  • Critique past planning efforts in underserved communities.

More Poster Details

The future of Mechanicsville, a neighborhood in Atlanta, Georgia, has been laid out in several previous plans, but they have resulted in little additional development for the neighborhood. Rather than creating another plan, the goal of this project is to provide an implementation framework for community-level development strategies. These strategies are based on extensive best practices research as well as key input from Mechanicsville stakeholders. The main objective of this project was to create a collection of practical ideas and recommendations which can be taken and applied by the Mechanicsville community, developers, and the city.

Presenters

Sarah Barrett

Disaster Resilience and Climate Change

Tools for Resilience: Mapping Social Vulnerability

What You'll Learn

  • Upon completion, participants will be able to develop a deeper understanding of the relationship between social vulnerability and planning for disaster resilience and recovery.
  • Upon completion, participants will be able to understand the value in using social indicators which will inspire policy changes for municipalities and disaster focused organizations.
  • Participants will see a prototype of a comprehensive tool and gain ideas for the use of open data and spatial analysis to increase the impact of resiliency planning efforts.

More Poster Details

This project seeks to alter the narrative around social vulnerability during flooding events to create more resilient strategies through the development of a system that identifies vulnerable populations, areas, and buildings. Resilience discourse focuses heavily on the economic and financial effects of flooding hazards. As factors of social vulnerability intensify the uncertainty communities face in relation to flooding, it is imperative that social indicators are included in disaster preparation, response, recovery, and mitigation. Our poster shows vulnerability scores associated with building footprints in Brooklyn using social and environmental indicators, and measures of accessibility, to develop a comprehensive tool for resilience.

Presenters

Pauline Claramunt Torche
Anna Stokes
Sean Nelsen

NYC's Public Housing and Rising Tides

What You'll Learn

  • Understand the current portfolio risk to New York City's public housing from sea level rise.
  • Be familiar with some of the unique contextual factors including historical influence and demographics.
  • Understand NYCHA's demographics and the vulnerabilities of its residents.

More Poster Details

Despite the sorry state of many NYCHA developments and recent scandals, New York City's public housing stock represents one of the last footholds for low-income families in an increasingly expensive and inaccessible city. Due to development paradigms at the time, many of NYCHA's sites are placed along the coast. How vulnerable is NYCHA to sea level rise? How should this vulnerability — in the short and long term — impact their planning, given their other funding and management issues? I'll be presenting summary statistics of the risk under different SLR scenarios and provide a demographic analysis of the populations at risk.

Presenter

Sara Trigoboff

Puerto Rico Disaster Mitigation and Recovery

What You'll Learn

  • Understand the challenges and opportunities of student-driven studios as an alternative model for outreach, community engagement, experiential learning, and planning assistance for disadvantaged communities.
  • Distinguish the unique planning challenges that face two communities in Puerto Rico, and compare how policies and community-driven actions for rural communities differ from more urban communities.
  • Describe the impact of Hurricane Maria on housing, transportation, and service infrastructure, and strategies to move forward to promote community well-being, equity, and socioeconomic development.

More Poster Details

Driven by their concern for Puerto Rico's population, graduate students at Georgia Tech with close ties to the island proposed a joint studio with the University of Puerto Rico. The student-driven studio concept was approved by the administrations, and students collaborated to achieve funding through the APA Foundation Disaster Grant. Students worked intensively with partners throughout the semester to understand the needs of two communities severely impacted by the storm, and to propose policy interventions and community-driven adaptation actions. Students traveled to Puerto Rico during spring break as part of the exchange. This poster presents results from the semester.

Presenters

Laura Geronimo
Roberto Morales Roman

Coastal-Land-Use-Resiliency: Developing GIS-Tools to Evaluate Regulatory-Policy

What You'll Learn

  • Define Costa Land-Use Resiliency.
  • Describe a method to evaluate Coastal Land-Use Resiliency.
  • Modify a Shoreline Setback GIS tool protocol to fit your respective geography.

More Poster Details

Using the best available data at the time, the County of Kauai passed a Shoreline Setback Ordinance (2008) to help manage near shore development. Almost 10 years later the Hawaii Climate Change Mitigation and Adaptation Commission published the first Hawaii Sea Level Rise Vulnerability and Adaptation Report (2017), which included the development of a series of multi-hazard coastal exposure-areas known as Sea Level Rise – Exposure Areas (SLR-XA). Using GIS tools we can adjust structure-outline polygons to locations mandated by the Shoreline Setback Ordinance and measure the effectiveness of this regulatory policy against the novel SLR-XA layers.

Presenter

Alan Clinton

Local Identity and Potable Water Reuse

What You'll Learn

  • Define potable reuse and articulate why this water management strategy is being explored.
  • Explain why community opinion of potable reclaimed water supplies is important.
  • Describe the factors that significantly influence expressed willingness to drink reclaimed water in this community.

More Poster Details

Water planners and managers are increasingly interested in incorporating reclaimed water into drinking supplies, particularly in rapidly growing arid and semi-arid urban areas such as the western United States. Northern Nevada is one location that is considering augmenting drinking water supplies with reclaimed water. However, past studies have shown that introduction of potable reclaimed water can be controversial and requires an understanding of public perceptions of the resource prior to implementation. This poster explores the socio-spatial factors that influence whether or not respondents in Northern Nevada express willingness to drink reclaimed water using community survey data collected in spring 2018.

Presenter

Samantha Redman

Climate Threats to Gullah Landmarks

What You'll Learn

  • Use flood mapping to prioritize adaptation strategies.
  • Identify relationships between climate and social vulnerability in Beaufort County.
  • Understand how African-American historical assets face unique climate threats.

More Poster Details

The imminent threat of sea level rise (SLR) signals not only the disappearance of shorelines, but the destruction of invaluable historical assets. In South Carolina's low-lying Beaufort County, 28 cultural landmarks central to Gullah-Geechee and African-American history are at risk of being underwater by 2100. The objective of this study is to understand which of these landmarks will be threatened under different SLR scenarios, and how the socioeconomic conditions of these areas compound their climate vulnerability. My work identifies which landmarks should be prioritized in both SLR adaptation plans and community development initiatives.

Presenter

Paul DeMerritt

The Texas Freedom Colonies Project

What You'll Learn

  • Recognize freedom colonies and their importance to planners, and define the vulnerability of Freedom Colonies to natural disasters.
  • Utilize the Texas Freedom Colonies Project Atlas, and locate mapped Freedom Colonies in the State of Texas.
  • Identify the role of participatory mapping and action research in disaster preparedness and recovery.

More Poster Details

From 1865-1920, African Americans founded 557 self-sustaining settlements called Freedom Colonies (FC) throughout Texas. Many FCs disappeared from public records, maps, and memory. Their population, historic buildings, and visibility declined after World War II due to sprawl, climate change, and gentrification. FCs are vulnerable to natural disasters, absent from public planning records, and lack access to the funding and technical assistance afforded incorporated, mapped areas in Texas. The project's interactive online web map application (Atlas) and archival materials would make settlements and their challenges visible to descendants, researchers, planners, and preservationists, enabling them to get funds to recover from natural disasters.

Presenter

Mohammadjavad Biazar

Disaster Resiliency: Hurricane Irma Response Analysis

What You'll Learn

  • Improve and reinforce planning strategies through the incorporation of comprehensive community resiliency techniques.
  • Identify resiliency factors that can be used to conduct an analysis of current planning objectives to improve and/or support community resiliency strategies.
  • Evaluate their jurisdiction's state of community resiliency by comparing their planning objectives with emergency management objectives to determine opportunities for more cohesive approaches to improving community resiliency.

More Poster Details

Effective emergency preparedness, response, recovery, and mitigation plans are crucial to the resilience of communities impacted by a disaster. On September 10, 2017, Hurricane Irma made landfall in southwest Florida as a Category 4, the fifth costliest disaster in U.S. history at $50 billion. Communities across the state were tested with the most catastrophic damage witnessed in Central and South Florida. This study uses a two-phased, coding methodology to systematically analyze 22 county-level after action reports (70 percent response rate) for breath and depth across 38 factors of resiliency. Results highlight strengths and weaknesses within and across the devastated counties.

Presenters

Jasmine Blais
Juan Lugo

Retrofitting Urban Streams for Resiliency

What You'll Learn

  • Understand the process and toolkit of landscape planning and design, from locating vulnerable areas to providing a plan for inclusive sustainable development.
  • Learn ways to assess and restore the health of urban streams.
  • Evaluate the merits of revitalizing an urban stream and its riparian corridor in providing climate-change resiliency, as well as creating accessible and recreational public spaces.

More Poster Details

Last century saw urban streams being "engulfed" as a result of rapid urbanization. However, the looming presence of climate change in the 21st century has shifted the tides, where urban areas are now being increasingly engulfed under water. Retrofitting natural systems within existing development can not only safeguard our cities from natural threats such as flash-floods, hurricanes, sea-level rise, etc., but also provide a wholesome model for sustainable development. This poster demonstrates this approach through the case study of Coney Island, a barrier island in New York, which was one of the worst affected areas during Hurricane Sandy in 2012.

Presenter

Onam Bisht

Quantifying the Impact of Sea-Level Rise

What You'll Learn

  • Understand how data at different scales impacts quantification of sea-level rise.
  • Have an idea of the number of individuals in the U.S. who will be impacted by sea-level rise in 2050 and what locations will be the most heavily impacted.
  • Have an understanding of which local communities will be most heavily impacted in terms of human and economic impacts

More Poster Details

The ability and the type of quantification possible with sea-level rise varies by scale, with the local level providing the best available data to understand impacts. The poster will use GIS technologies to present varying data at the global, national, and local scale to assist with both the understanding of the social and economic costs and the locations of greatest impact of sea-level rise.

Presenters

Carrie Whitlock
Katherine Wakefield

Housing, Community and Economic Development

Evaluating Local Source of Income Policies

What You'll Learn

  • Understand how local market trends impact SOI law effectiveness.
  • Understand how to evaluate an SOI law.
  • Determine if an SOI law would be effective in their jurisdiction.

More Poster Details

Federal housing choice vouchers are intended to expand housing access for low-income Americans. However, in many jurisdictions landlords can choose not to accept vouchers. Some city and state governments have adopted source of income (SOI) laws to prohibit voucher discrimination. This study explores how SOI laws affect voucher utilization rates, updating Lance Freeman's 2011 work by controlling for local housing market trends. Using a crossover design with fixed effects, this research focuses on local SOI laws and controls for rental vacancy rates and total number of vouchers issued. Results indicate these controls have a significant effect on overall utilization rates.

Presenters

Elisabeth Altazan
Audrey Muntz

Affordable Housing in TOD Areas, Hawaii

  • Identify some of the best practices regarding affordable housing in TOD areas.
  • Gain a better understanding of the Hawaiian affordable housing context.
  • Identify some of the challenges with affordable housing in TOD areas.

As Hawaii is starting to develop its rail, and affordable housing has become a scarcity on island, our research project looks at how we can use TOD as a way to develop affordable housing. The project gleans best practices to inform how affordable housing in transit-oriented development (TOD) areas could be in Hawaii. The best practices can be innovative in terms of either their design or policy interventions. The findings for affordable housing in Hawaii would be innovative yet sensitive to the Hawaiian context.

Presenters

Tamara Edwards
Yusraa Tadj

Affordable Housing Need in Georgia Counties

What You'll Learn

  • Describe how the Gross Rent as a Percentage of Household Income (GRAPI) and the number of occupants per room effects affordable housing needs in Georgia at a county level.
  • Define how socioeconomic indicators can be used to score a rank affordable housing needs.
  • Conduct their own replication analyses of affordable housing need using socioeconomic indicators for different geographies.

More Poster Details

This poster targets the Housing, Community, and Economic Development educational track. Much of the research on affordable housing begins with supply — a count of the amount of affordable housing available. This poster's goal is to score and represent each county in Georgia based on demand for affordable housing by measuring population-level socioeconomic indicators. Analysis will be performed using ACS 2017 five-year estimate data for GRAPI, number of occupants per room, and comparing those to the median housing value for each county. Lower scores represent counties with less need/demand for affordable housing while higher scores represent more need/demand for such housing.

Presenter

Robert Highfield

Frequent User System Engagement Studies Survey

What You'll Learn

  • Understand what a FUSE study entails and the concept of a "frequent user" from a systems engagement perspective.
  • Determine if their local government is a good match for a FUSE study and know where the study is best housed in their municipality based on previous successful projects.
  • Understand how supportive housing impacts economics, life quality, and community viability across systems.

More Poster Details

Ambulance paramedics, shelter attendees, emergency department doctors, and law enforcement officials know by name the individuals they engage with the most. Interactions are sometimes daily. Systems are not meeting the needs of these frequent users, and high usage is expensive. Frequent User System Engagement projects are underway or completed in over 30 locations across the U.S.; a survey of FUSE studies nationwide will add to the literature as more governments tackle coordinated care, supportive housing, and budget cuts.

Presenter

Aliza Tuttle

The Brownfields to Brightfields Project

What You'll Learn

  • Promote sustainability and sustainable development from the early stage of their education, then encourage residents and local decision makers to see solar energy generation as an opportunity for sustainable economic development.
  • Understand the federal, state, and local level brownfields redevelopment processes and related policies.
  • Equip planning students with physical planning skills such as GIS and land use analysis as well as soft skills such as public speaking, public presentations, and data visualization.

More Poster Details

The Brownfields to Brightfields project was implemented in Fall 2018 as Ball State University's Regional Analysis and Design Studio. This community-based course was built around the theme of promoting a more sustainable community through analysis of the solar energy potential of existing brownfields of East Central Indiana. It was composed of 17 urban planning students interested in regional planning, brownfield redevelopment, application of GIS-based planning techniques to regional scale, and sustainable community-building. This project was funded by a BSU Provost's Immersive Learning grant due to its focus on community-based learning and conducted partnering with Sierra Club Hoosier Chapter.

Presenters

Jefferson Reece
Batul Ather
Kenzie Hughes
Jacob McQueen
Sanglim Yoo

Housing Insecurity in South Carolina

What You'll Learn

  • Understand the relative contributions of key factors driving the high eviction filing rates in South Carolina.
  • Discuss practical solutions applicable to the state of South Carolina and the Southeast for providing for more affordable housing and lowering the number of evictions.
  • Describe who is most affected by evictions in the U.S., specifically in the state of South Carolina.

More Poster Details

Data from Matthew Desmond's EvictionLab shows the Southeast has some of the highest eviction rates in the nation. At 22 percent, South Carolina has an eviction filing rate three times the national average. This poster shows results from an analysis of the relative effects of demographic (household structure, gender, etc.), economic (income, employment status, etc.), and physical factors (2015 floods) on eviction filing rates in South Carolina. The findings are used to develop recommendations for how planners and policymakers can effectively lower the number of evictions as part of a wider effort to ensure access to secure housing in the U.S.

Presenter

Molly Kaminski

International, Comparative, and Global Planning

Comparative Urbanisms

What You'll Learn

  • Identify UNESCO creative city classes and examples of their designated cities from around the world.
  • Compare UNESCO creative cities in terms of their built environments, urban histories, and sustainability efforts.
  • Recognize how UNESCO creative cities use their creative class designation to influence planning.

More Poster Details

The UNESCO Creative City Network comprises seven classes: Music, Film, Gastronomy, Craft and Folk Art, Media Arts, Literature, and Design. Nine Urban Planning students at the University of Missouri in Kansas City have researched, analyzed and compared 28 of the creative cities designated by UNESCO. Each city is explored through their built environments, urban histories, sustainability efforts, and their designated creative city class. The study shows how these cities have developed at different time periods, patterns, and rates. However, one thing they share is how they use their creative aspects to plan.

Presenters

Jared Islas
Adair Bright
Logan Sours
Bryce Morgan
Brad Hocevar
Christina Aurich

Mapping Smart Growth in the UK

What You'll Learn

  • Understand how data, mapping, and spatial analysis can be used to communicate changes to settlement patterns, and the importance of location to achieving economic, social, and environmental outcomes.
  • Describe how data, mapping, and spatial analysis can identify unsustainable urban sprawl and be used to influence planning policy.
  • Understand how professional bodies like APA and RTPI can use data and spatial analysis to campaign for better national policy and more sustainable planning outcomes.

More Poster Details

Technology offers new ways for professional bodies around the world to understand the impacts of changing planning policy. In the UK, the Royal Town Planning Institute (RTPI) used spatial analysis to explore whether planning reform, aimed at boosting housing supply, is leading to unsustainable urban sprawl. Over a five-year period, we mapped permissions for over 220,000 new homes in fast-growing city-regions, analyzing the scale of development and proximity to jobs and public transit. Through attractive infographics, this poster reveals our findings and shows how we've used them to campaign for better policy and improve planning practice.

Presenters

James Harris
Tippe Morlan

Managing Change in Communities

Activating Downtown Webster City

What You'll Learn

  • Better understand revitalization in rural Iowa.
  • Identify best practices for peer cities of Webster City, Iowa.
  • Describe a number of issues that towns in rural Iowa and the Midwest may be facing.

More Poster Details

Webster City, Iowa, has faced disproportionate challenges since it lost a major employer. The planning team has been working on diversifying the local economy and creating an active downtown with a sense of place that residents take pride in and identify with. The planning team has held multiple public outreach events to determine what the community views as valuable characteristics, and what kinds of stores and activities would attract visitors to the downtown. Additionally, there has been significant research conducted for strategies to improve building facades and the overall aesthetics of the downtown.

Presenters

Jasmine Frias
Jess Baker
Reuben Grandon
Emily Legel

Addressing Economic Mobility Through Food Banks

What You'll Learn

  • Reimagine ways to activate social oriented organizations for more networked approaches to social issues.
  • Identify planning-adjacent organizations to help planners accomplish their goals.
  • Think of alternative avenues for economic development through more localized interventions.

More Poster Details

The Atlanta Community Food Bank is looking to activate its partnership network in new ways to improve the economic mobility of its clients, in addition to providing the service of food distribution. Through a case study with interviews, reviews of academic literature, and best practices I synthesize organizational characteristics that suggest a partner has capacity and motivation to help clients increase their economic mobility, not just meet an emergency food need. The poster concludes with a typological framework to help the food bank make strategic decisions on partnerships to create a more networked approach to food security through economic mobility.

Presenter

Mirit Friedman

ADUs As Short and Long-Term Rentals

What You'll Learn

  • Define owner decisions regarding ADUs.
  • Explore differences and similarities of using ADUs for short and long-term rentals.
  • Detect the financial implications of using ADUs as short versus long-term rentals.

More Poster Details

ADUs are fully independent, second housing units located on single-family lots. Because of their potential to add density and housing diversity to single-family neighborhoods they are viewed as part of the toolkit to combat housing shortages in multiple cities over the past decade. Portland promotes the development of ADUs through city code and incentives for this reason. A 2017 survey of ADU owners and tenants in Portland, OR provides detail on the real use of ADUs as long-term rental housing, short-term housing, housing for friends and family, and issues that underlay various uses.

Presenter

Yael Kidron

Open Building: Planning for Incremental Development

What You'll Learn

  • Upon completion, participants will understand the Open Building concept and examples of its implementation in the US and abroad.
  • Upon completion, participants will understand the benefits of the Open Building approach in the planning and creation of sustainable and resilient communities.
  • Upon completion, participants will understand the implications of the Open Building approach for planning and zoning within their own communities.

More Poster Details

The Open Building movement (www.councilonopenbuilding.org) provides a theory and tools that allow buildings and communities to evolve incrementally over time. While we as planners and urban designers have become adept at creating finer-grained communities, the results, while initially successful, are often fixed over time through negotiated agreements like PUDs. Cities thrive in part because they have a built-in capacity for incremental renewal, something that gets lost as ever-larger sections of our cities become "locked in." OB may help lay the groundwork for a new way of thinking about "large-scale incremental development" – large projects that encourage organic evolution over time.

Presenters

Merrill St. Leger
Christopher French

Planning for Inclusiveness and Social Justice

Neighborhood Environment and the Elderly

What You'll Learn

  • Share my research results about neighborhood environment and the elderly's aging-in-place experiences in Singapore's context.
  • Gain new insights about neighborhood planning and design for aging population and provide directions for my PhD study at later stage.
  • Meet new people from different backgrounds and build up networks for my career development and explore collaboration with planners and researchers worldwide.

More Poster Details

To confront aging challenges and opportunities, "aging-in-place" is promoted by policy and preferred by the elderly. Taking Singapore public housing estates as case studies, this poster presents how neighborhood environment influences the elderly 's aging-in-place experiences. This study uses observation and interview (aged 55 years old and above, n=30) as the research method. The results highlight the necessity of planning neighborhood spaces as a system instead of as fragmented and lifeless pieces. Neighborhood planning and design should go beyond a functional and utilitarian approach and prioritize people's everyday experiences. Meanwhile, more attention should be paid to the elderly's lifestyles and interests.

Presenter

Yuxin Cao

Plan with Participatory Place-Based Art

What You'll Learn

  • Theorize the capacity and benefits of participatory planning with art tactics.
  • Evaluate the process and outcomes of participatory planning utilizing art for its effectiveness and appropriateness for the respective demographics, resources, and context.
  • Apply participatory art strategies to their local contexts for inclusive community engagement.

More Poster Details

This poster proposes a protocol evaluating the effectiveness and appropriateness for planners and community-based organizations to employ different participatory place-based art strategies to maintain a relationship with community members, provide tailored support and programs, and build local capacity against gentrification and displacement. This democratic method aims to address the needs of the underrepresented demographics and create a more inclusive and just urban environment. The work of three community-based organizations, serving large ethnic minority populations across the country, illustrate the process of art-related community engagement tactics and demonstrate the potential for stereotype disruption, economic growth, and social cohesion.

Presenter

Di Cui

CALD Planning in Penang, Malaysia

What You'll Learn

  • Recommend ways to attract and engage more effectively with culturally and linguistically diverse communities who do not have prior knowledge and experience of participating in planning.
  • Examine the social and political context of planning in a developing South East Asian country, and explore the role of Western planners and concepts in this context.
  • Observe the effects of institutional framework and readiness on planning processes, outcomes and sustainability, and possible roles and limitations of partnerships with nonprofit organizations and grassroots committees.

More Poster Details

Malaysia is a culturally and linguistically diverse middle-income developing country. The Malaysian state of Penang is composed of 44.4 percent Malay, 44.2 percent Chinese, 10.6 percent Indian, 0.3 percent Indigenous, and 0.3 percent other ethnicities. However, the public sector and planning agencies are predominantly monoethnic and unilingual, which makes advocacy and communicative planning more challenging. Challenges, outcomes, and lessons learned will be presented using case studies and discussions of institutional frameworks — community planning and placemaking in the suburb of Pulau Tikus, gender responsive and participatory budgeting by the Penang Island City Council, and the development and public response for the Penang Transport Master Plan.

Presenter

Soo Huey Yap

Bridging the Transportation Divide

What You'll Learn

  • Summarize the importance of the Freedom Colonies Project, and colonies themselves, to planning.
  • Understand the importance of voice to marginalized communities within planning.
  • Utilize new and novel tools for community engagement within a variety of contexts.

More Poster Details

Transportation projects have historically harmed disadvantaged communities. The importance of community engagement and introducing equity concepts into planning has grown out of these historic injustices. Increasing visibility is a necessary step in engaging communities within planning processes at all levels. This poster will focus on how Dr. Robert's Freedom Colonies Project can be used to impact community engagement, historic preservation, and transportation planning. Incorporating voiceless communities into the planning process requires new methods; the Atlas provides a tool for collecting and disseminating information, the next step is to incorporate that information and bridge the divide between these communities and planners.

Presenter

Jacqueline Kuzio

Building Healthy, Equitable Communities Through Collaboration

What You'll Learn

  • Better understand an award-winning collaborative model to improve community health.
  • Describe health equity and its importance to capital planning efforts such as neighborhood safety improvements.
  • Demonstrate successes and challenges in prioritizing health equity in capital planning efforts.

More Poster Details

The award-winning Get Healthy San Mateo County Initiative is a Bay Area collaborative working towards improving community health for its 750,000+ residents. It's a county that is perennially recognized as one of the healthiest counties in California but also where life expectancy for black residents is almost seven years less than the life expectancy of white residents. Guided by a community engagement process in 2014, the collaborative prioritizes four areas: Healthy Schools, Housing, Economy, and Neighborhoods. Learn about one of the ways this approach has manifested in securing data-driven transportation infrastructure investments in the county's most vulnerable communities.

Presenter

Brian Oh

We Need Dust-Free Plans for Equity

What You'll Learn

  • Describe the purpose and planning applications, including transparency and accountability, of the Universal Community Planning Tool.
  • Understand the development process for implementing and promoting the tool in Washington, D.C.
  • Apply lessons learned and successes from OurHealthyDC.org to identify how the tool could be used in other communities.

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The District of Columbia was awarded a grant from the Public Health National Centers for Innovation (6/2018–10/2018) to deploy the Universal Community Planning Tool (UCPT) as part of the community health improvement process. A dense urban area with many city-wide plans, DC has the unique ability to use the UCPT to monitor DC HP2020 actions while also increasing transparent, meaningful, and equitable engagement through community-led discussions, collective reporting on priority action indicator data, and alignment with other planning processes to reduce the burden of repeated engagement in certain communities. The UCPT can be leveraged in other communities to monitor plans and improve engagement in planning processes.

Presenter

Emily Putzer

Democracy Beyond Elections: Equitable Civic Engagement

What You'll Learn

  • Investigate several proven, practical civic engagement tools that make public participation practices more equitable and inclusive for diverse audiences.
  • Appraise and critique the strengths and weaknesses of conventional and emerging public participation practices, and applicability of practices to their local jurisdiction.
  • Discover opportunities to connect with and learn from the Democracy Beyond Elections coalition and policy platform, including planning-focused pilot projects and case studies.

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Democracy reform is a crucial, often overlooked element in securing community-based leadership for equitable planning. Democracy Beyond Elections is a collaborative campaign focused on building participatory democracy and civic engagement beyond elections, to empower people to decide together more of the issues that affect their lives. The growing list of partners includes the Participatory Budgeting Project, Civic Hall, Everyday Democracy, Generation Citizen, and ioby. Preview our emerging policy platform, which includes proven practices like diversifying boards and commissions, participatory budgeting, policy juries and citizen initiative reviews, action civics, legislative theater, civic crowd-funding, participatory placemaking and policy making, and participatory justice.

Presenters

Ginevra Browne
Jennifer So Godzeno

Planning Practice and Careers

 

Planning, Health, and the Natural Environment

Park Suitability Analysis in Birmingham, Alabama

What You'll Learn

  • Identify potential park sites in Birmingham, Alabama.
  • Understand why our methodology relates to our goals of preservation, equitable distribution of parks, and stormwater management.
  • Understand how to apply land suitability analyses to non-real estate development contexts.

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Birmingham, Alabama's 2014 Comprehensive Plan calls for new parks that protect environmentally sensitive land, make use of vacant industrial space, and help improve air and water quality. In addition to the plan goals, we incorporated an equity component in the study. The research presented addresses the following question: Considering equity and environmental factors, where should the City of Birmingham, Alabama, develop new parks? To assess areas in need of a park, our suitability analysis uses the following six factors: population density, population density of children, proximity to flood zones, proximity to wetlands, distance to existing parks, and income distribution.

Presenters

Leigh Huffman
Anna Baggett

Implementation Master Plan for the Stitch

What You'll Learn

  • Understand the complexities of air rights development, inter-governmental coordination, and large-scale public planning.
  • Describe the potential benefits highway cap parks have on a community including social, environmental, and economic benefits.
  • Demonstrate the need for evaluating our highway system and reversing and mitigating its historical adverse impacts.

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The Stitch is a planned 14-acre highway cap park that spans the I-75/I-85 highway connector in Downtown Atlanta. The Stitch is envisioned to repurpose underutilized assets created by the interstate highway system, foster transit-oriented development for MARTA rail, create urban greenspace and new development sites, and develop a vibrant public realm with quality civic infrastructure and interconnected open spaces. This poster will describe the project and planning process for its implementation up to construction, including: a brief overview of the project and precedents, potential impacts, implementation schedule, engagement and funding strategy, preliminary design, and long-term operations management.

Presenter

Carson Cooper

Urban Forest Planning: 10 Policy/Streetscape Mistakes

What You'll Learn

  • Identify what a comprehensive municipal urban forestry program looks like.
  • Understand how to apply five policy actions to promote urban forestry.
  • Understand how to apply five streetscape actions to promote urban forestry.

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Urban forests are underperforming in cities across the United States. Despite the overwhelming consensus that trees provide a plethora of services to our communities, they are still marginalized in comprehensive planning agendas. While trees have potential to be long-lived, their lives are shortened in urban environments. While some of this mortality can be attributed to infestation, disease, and other unforeseen circumstances, the large majority of urban tree decline is due to poor planning. By neglecting to value trees like other city infrastructure we are discounting their societal value and setting them up for failure.

Presenter

Ryan Vogel

Webster City Parks and Recreation Plan

What You'll Learn

  • Sustainability.
  • Equity, Health, and Wellness.
  • Safety.

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Graduate students from the University of Iowa created a parks and recreation master plan for the city of Webster City, Iowa. What makes this process unique is the approach to challenges this smaller community is facing now as well as challenges it will face in the future. Many towns face this relevant topic of providing adequate park space and programming for residents, as well as attracting new visitors. Along with community input: our vision involves supporting human, natural, and aesthetic uses of public spaces, ensuring inclusive and appropriate programming, and preparing for future population growth.

Presenters

Fernando De Carvalho Oliveira Neto
Brian Dunkelberger
Jocelyn Borjas
Seth Thomas

Siting Wind Energy in Linn County

What You'll Learn

  • Identify the regulatory, suitability, and compatibility considerations in siting utility-scale wind energy in Linn County, Iowa.
  • Understand Linn County, Iowa's process for effectively evaluating conditional-use permits for utility-scale wind energy applications.
  • Extrapolate from the experiences of Linn County, Iowa, for their respective jurisdictions and inform their own utility-scale wind energy application evaluation process.

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Graduate students at the School of Urban and Regional Planning at the University of Iowa, in partnership with Linn County Planning and Development, developed a process to inform the optimal placement of utility-scale wind farms in Linn County with consideration for regulatory, suitability, and compatibility constraints. Through spatial analyses with ESRI ArcMap and AWS Truepower OpenWind, this project intends to provide Linn County decision makers with the resources to effectively evaluate conditional use permits for utility-scale wind energy projects within their jurisdiction.

Presenters

Zhi Chen
Michael Delp

Exploring Environmental Justice in Jersey City

What You'll Learn

  • Examine environmental equity.
  • Identify where the highest quantities of contaminated sites are located in Jersey City.
  • Explore any relationship between income, race, and brownfield sites.

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This research sought to answer the following question: Is there a disproportionate number of brownfield sites in communities of color in Jersey City? Brownfields perpetuate blight, lower property values, and can impact human health. And, while there are benefits from their redevelopment, it is necessary to examine the underlying sociodemographic landscape of brownfields. Such context can help planners ascertain whether environmental justice issues are present, which can then better inform more equitable approaches to urban redevelopment.

Presenter

Melissa Cameron

The Environmental-Justice Case for Congestion Pricing

What You'll Learn

  • Describe and discuss the nexus of climate change policy and local community health.
  • Evaluate the environmental justice impacts of congestion pricing using quantitative data.
  • Recommend policy solutions that can be undertaken to promote environmental equity.

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Local air pollutants not only contribute to poor air quality and smog throughout the Los Angeles region, but are particularly devastating for residential neighborhoods near congested freeways. These freeway-adjacent neighborhoods are disproportionately low-income communities and disproportionately communities of color. Toxic emissions from congested freeways have severe health impacts on these communities including increased risk of asthma, heart disease, and premature death. These health concerns are especially disturbing for infants and children who may live their entire lives near congested freeways. Seen in this light, congestion pricing is not just a question of economic efficiency, but one of environmental justice.

Presenter

Austin Stanion

Neighborhood Makes or Breaks Active Aging

What You'll Learn

  • List factors of neighborhood experience through which active living enhances older adults' psychosocial health.
  • Discuss limitations of causal analysis using cross-sectional data with reference to subjects and methods used in the poster.
  • Tailor active living recommendations and concomitant spatial intervention for older adults of various health capabilities.

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Active living is believed to enhance older adults' health. But how does it occur? What, specifically, in doing those tasks makes older adults healthier? With reference to a transdisciplinary framework (Gan, 2017, Housing & Society), this paper examines how active living enhances older adults' psychosocial health. Structural equation modeling of questionnaire data from 270 community-dwelling older adults in Singapore's public housing shows neighborhood experience mediates between active living and psychosocial health after controlling for gender, education, and ethnicity. Environmental pleasantness, time outdoors, communal affordances, and embeddedness are factors of neighborhood experience through which active living enhances older adults' psychosocial health.

Presenter

Daniel Gan

Planning for Coastal Michigan's Groundwater Challenges

What You'll Learn

  • Observe different approaches to addressing water quantity and quality issues.
  • Demonstrate a basic understanding of the unique groundwater challenges occurring in areas of Michigan's Lower Peninsula.
  • Express the challenges of water availability in rural areas.

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Contrary to popular belief, Michigan does not have an unlimited supply of freshwater. The Great Lakes are vast, but the majority of the state is rural and relies on groundwater that is not sourced from the lake systems. Unique geological challenges have caused wells along certain coastal regions to run dry or become hyper-saline. Along the shores of Lake Michigan, local planners from Ottawa County have teamed up with scientists, policymakers, and stakeholders to identify practical solutions to ensure water is available for future generations.

Presenters

Danielle Bouchard
Matthew Chappuies

E. coli: The Water Quality/Land Use Nexus

What You'll Learn

  • Gain a deeper understanding of the complex nature of E. coli as indicator bacteria for fecal contamination. Learn about associated public health and policy implications.
  • Learn the difference between land cover and land use, and understand GIS tools for exploring the nexus between land cover/use changes and water quality.
  • Understand how this kind of research and available data can translate to future water quality planning for the public and private sectors.

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Cities throughout the Southeast and across the U.S. face realities of rapid growth. In a frenzy to address evolving challenges, planning tends to be reactive, rather than proactive. Planners and engineers make decisions that directly and indirectly affect urban water quality. The situation is complicated by the absence of interdisciplinary and cooperative city policies. Nonpoint source pollution plagues urban streams. The ArcHydro extension within ArcGIS allows a more comprehensive and holistic watershed-based approach to understanding land cover/land use effects on water quality. Data from this type of analysis can better inform all stakeholders about changes to policies and design standards.

Presenter

Katherine Amidon

Evaluating Health Impacts of District-Planning Decisions

What You'll Learn

  • Describe the challenges of documenting and calculating the economic and social benefits of working to improve public health through district-scale built environment interventions.
  • Utilize health-focused project evaluation data to refine design and development processes and increase project impact.
  • Partner with academic and other research institutions to track interim health outcomes, continue building longitudinal evidence base, and translate results for practitioner application.

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My research explores the role of designers and developers in the prevention of chronic disease, particularly in the context of community-scale urban design and planning projects. I attempt to: (1) describe the challenges of documenting and calculating the economic and social benefits of working to improve public health through built environment interventions, and (2) ask how project evaluation data might help refine design processes to increase project impact. This poster examines U.S. health districts — new-build and redevelopment projects that leverage hospitals as anchor institutions to catalyze health-promoting infrastructure and programming — which are well-positioned for the application of a variety of evaluation methods.

Presenter

Sarah Skenazy

Politics, Policy, and Government

Aurora Places Comprehensive Plan

What You'll Learn

  • Understand Aurora's continuing transition from suburban community to a diverse, urban destination for living and working.
  • Conduct a broad and inclusive outreach effort to support community visioning and planning.
  • Understand the value of placemaking in Aurora's quality of life and economic vitality.

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Aurora Places, the city of Aurora, Colorado's new comprehensive plan, serves as a foundation for decision making related to growth and development. It presents a vision for the future, with goals and recommendations to realize the vision. The plan emphasizes the importance of creating a variety of places throughout the city. "Placetypes" include dynamic urban districts, vibrant commercial and industrial areas, parks and open space, employment and innovation districts, and distinctive neighborhoods. Public outreach was crucial to the creation of Aurora Places. The input collected from residents, business owners, and other stakeholders was critical in understanding the community's concerns, aspirations, and priorities.

Presenter

Daniel Krzyzanowski

Small Town and Rural Planning

Transit Reform for Georgia's Rural Counties

What You'll Learn

  • Better understand the types of transit trips rural populations take and the services needed to provide these trips.
  • Understand how to apply ridership analysis to on demand transit service where every trip has a unique destination and origin.
  • Propose service changes and discuss service reforms for rural transit systems with state DOTs and county governments.

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Last year at APA, I presented on this issue. Now, I have come up with actual solutions, which I will be presenting to the Georgia Department of Transportation for implementation and incorporation into the state's first statewide transit plan later this year. I focus on using ridership data to inform service reform, a methodology often applied to urban fixed route systems, but rarely to rural on-demand systems. This can serve as a model for researchers and state DOTs in other states looking to modernize their services.

Presenter

Andreas Wolfe

Georgia's Rural Zones: One Year Update

What You'll Learn

  • Understand the impacts of Georgia's Rural Zone Program.
  • Apply this program to their state.
  • Communicate planning in economic development terms.

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Recognizing that many small, rural downtown areas have experienced varying levels of economic distress, DCA worked with the Georgia General Assembly to secure passage of a bill calling for the development of "Rural Zones." This is Georgia's first program to reward proactive downtown planning with place-based tax credits. Communities must conduct strategic planning for their historic downtown areas in order to be designated as Rural Zones. These areas are then able to offer tax credits for approved rehabilitation efforts and increased employment. So far, 18 Rural Zones have been designated across the state.

Presenter

Cameron Yearty

Technology and Planning

Small-Town Vision through Drone Visualization

What You'll Learn

  • Discuss challenges of planning in rural areas, especially in the southeastern part of the U.S.
  • Use strategies for drone usage in their own local planning.
  • Identify how drone usage in planning can benefit rural areas specifically.

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Over the summer and fall semesters, Clemson University planning students completed a community plan for the small town of Lamar, South Carolina. Using drone imaging as a method for collecting data, the students, along with town residents, utilized the drone images as a platform for predicting new development in the town center as well as a template for new possibilities for public art and meeting spaces. The poster shares these drone images and how students and residents utilized them as a tool for small-town economic and community development.

Presenters

Molly Kaminski
Caitlin Coppinger
Jay Keaveny

Visualizing Spatial Trade-offs of Adaptation Policies

What You'll Learn

  • Assess the impact of overlapping jurisdictions and regulations in coastal cities on adaptation planning.
  • Examine the relationship between desired spatial outcomes with competing land use and zoning restrictions.
  • Discuss the pros and cons of utilizing technological tools to bridge parcel-by-parcel decision making for regional outcomes.

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Coordinated, regional adaptation strategies such as building hard barriers, growing wetlands, and managing retreat are needed to adapt effectively to rising seas and extreme storms in coastal cities. However, coastal areas often have overlapping policies dictated by various jurisdictions, posing planners with decision-making and implementation barriers. Our project combines municipal and state datasets including zoning codes, land use, environmental restrictions, and projected storm surges into a spatially enabled relational database to determine restrictions at a parcel-by-parcel level. Virtual modification is enabled to simulate 3D scenarios such as maximum build out under future conditions or development implications to building a seawall.

Presenters

Collyn Chan
Scott Gilman

Fostering Participation by Mobile Augmented Reality

What You'll Learn

  • Describe how mobile participation can complement conventional participatory methods by increasing in-situ engagement.
  • Explain the interactive and intuitive capabilities of mobile Augmented Reality in engaging communities, particularly in low-SES and racial/ethnic neighborhoods.
  • Reflect how CommunitAR can be utilized in the planning profession to bring together residents to make their neighborhoods healthier and more walkable.

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Augmented Reality (AR) is becoming a favorite visualization tool due to its unique ability to superimpose virtual objects on the surrounding environment through mobile devices. Moreover, smartphones are ubiquitous nowadays and for many are only means to benefit from the digital world. Participatory e-planning can integrate such capabilities of mobile AR in participation methods to facilitate the visualization of design scenarios and advance collaborative decision making. The intuitive nature of CommunitAR helps citizens assess walking-related street features and share their preference on the future walkable design of their neighborhoods with other stakeholders, while they are all in situ.

Presenter

S. Saeed Ahmadi Oloonabadi

OpenHazus: An Online Risk Assessment Platform

What You'll Learn

  • Access existing authoritative risk assessment data for their area for immediate incorporation in mitigation or land-use plans and submit their own local risk information for inclusion in an online platform.
  • Conduct a gap analysis for risk assessment information available in their area and collaborate with authors of pre-existing risk studies of interest.
  • Re-prioritize costly risk modeling activities to fill significant gaps in risk assessment information in their area while leveraging pre-existing authoritative risk data.

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FEMA's Hazus is a leading publicly available risk modeling software for natural hazards in the U.S. Hundreds of risk assessments are prepared by planners every year using Hazus, but these rich sources of planning data are not available in a centralized platform for sharing, viewing, and downloading. FEMA is collecting dozens of baseline and scenario-specific natural hazard risk assessments prepared by Hazus experts and planners across the U.S. and integrating them into an interactive online platform where planners can access existing risk information for their area without undertaking expensive and time-consuming risk assessment projects.

Presenters

Jordan Burns
Doug Bausch
Casey Zuzak

A Story Map of Embark Richmond Highway

What You'll Learn

  • Apply the use of the ESRI Story Map to different planning practice scenarios.
  • Include another tool for reaching out to underrepresented population in their community outreach methods.
  • Consider the use of unique technologies to help convey complex concepts in planning.

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The Embark Story Map is a web application that combines the attributes of a written narrative with a digital map whose features allow the audience to learn specific details about the Embark Comprehensive Plan amendment within the context of community's geography. In its design, the story map brings to life a summary of the approximately 300-page plan through interactive maps, three-dimensional renderings, videos, and other visualization graphics. The story map is a dynamic web application that significantly enhanced community engagement during the Embark Richmond Highway comprehensive planning study and subsequent implementation efforts, and overall has promoted greater public understanding of the plan recommendations.

Presenter

Alexis Robinson

Transportation

Regional Bike Sharing Lessons from Start-up

What You'll Learn

  • Understand some of what it takes to start a regional bike share system with multiple stakeholders.
  • Understand bike share data.
  • Realize more time is always needed than originally planned.

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This poster presents a review of bicycle usage data of the Roam NRV bike share, including a summary of trips completed since start up along with bike lockups outside of hubs. A brief discussion ensues regarding bike utilization, hub density, and lockups as an indicator of hub expansion with qualitative data to consider. The poster includes suggestions for starting a bike share system, particularly in environments where most users are university students. I also review challenges of balancing multiple stakeholders for a regional bike share within the context of research and comparably sized bike share systems, and offer next steps.

Presenters

Colie Touzel
Erik Olsen

Changing Urban Mobility, Lagging Infrastructure

What You'll Learn

  • Frame a better discussion with their communities about emergent trends in changing urban mobility.
  • Identify critical transportation infrastructure in their communities that is under-performing.
  • List possible adaptive solutions for lagging transportation infrastructure and the policy measures for implementation on a wide scale.

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Since the 1950s, transportation in most U.S. cities has focused largely on personal vehicle travel. Accordingly, metropolitan areas were radically altered during this time to accommodate the flow and storage of cars. The immense cost, expanse, and physical scale of this infrastructure has had lasting ramifications for cities. Now, as behavioral shifts point towards lower car-ownership rates and higher acceptance of alternative urban mobility options, municipalities are faced with a fundamental disconnect in their existing transportation infrastructure and future urban mobility trends. This raises critical questions for city planners about how best to adapt this infrastructure.

Presenter

Colin Brown

Improving Safety and Connectivity Through Restriping

What You'll Learn

  • Upon completion, participants will be able to summarize a "road diet" and the typical components.
  • Upon completion, participants will be able to analyze the impact of a road diet given existing and proposed conditions.
  • Upon completion, participants will be able to judge whether or not a site, given the existing conditions, is a good candidate for a road diet.

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Road restriping projects, frequently called "road diets," are one of the 20 proven safety countermeasures defined by the Federal Highway Administration. Utilizing completed projects and an extensive literature review as guidance, a road diet project will be simulated and analyzed on a four-lane corridor in Central Virginia. The project site is in front of a school and is amongst several planned and completed roadway improvements which include pedestrian accommodations. A road diet at this site has the potential to connect several neighborhoods, schools, and commercial hubs by providing safe facilities for bicycles and pedestrians.

Presenter

Hannah MacKnight

Transportation Equity: Automated Vehicles, Sustainability & Accessibility

What You'll Learn

  • Describe innovative strategies for both small and larger communities for anticipating the potential impacts of automated vehicles in future planning activities.
  • Define equity and inclusion in the context of planning for automated vehicles.
  • Describe the strengths and weaknesses of scenario planning methods as they relate to future land use and transportation planning decisions related to automated vehicles.

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A team from the University of Iowa prepared short- and long-term adaptation and equity strategies for Iowa City related to the integration of automated vehicles. This project draws on academic literature, Federal Highway Administration guidelines, and stakeholder engagement to inform policy interventions that address current mobility needs of Iowa City residents as well as a series of scenarios related to a future with deployed automated vehicles. The proposed framework is both adaptable to the context of similar communities and can be scaled to the conditions of larger ones.

Presenters

Jeremy Williams
Chanel Jelovchan
Bogdan Kapatsila
Hossain Mohiuddin

Sidewalk Assessment Methods for Pedestrian Mobility

What You'll Learn

  • Describe the regulations put forth by the Americans with Disabilities Act with respect to pedestrian infrastructure.
  • Conduct a comprehensive sidewalk quality assessment using the presented methods and systems.
  • Prioritize the allocation of limited funding toward specific sidewalk enhancement projects and mitigate risk.

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While municipal planners recognize the mobility, environmental, and health benefits associated with non-motorized travel, recent lawsuits related to the deficient quality of city sidewalks have resulted in reinvigorated commitment to the improvement of pedestrian infrastructure that facilitates active mobility and achieves Americans with Disability Act (ADA) compliance. Researchers at Georgia Tech have developed and deployed a multi-faceted asset management system that allows for an analytical and comprehensive assessment of the location and condition of all pedestrian facilities. This poster provides an overview of the system technology and detailed summary of a contracted project for Cobb County, Georgia.

Presenters

Jeremy Greenwald
Deep Patel

Analyzing Bikeshare Activity Using Bing Maps API

What You'll Learn

  • Comparison of bike-share infrastructure effectiveness across US cities.
  • Visualization and deep analysis of big data in transportation.
  • Applying open-source API tools to large-scale transportation planning study.

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This poster inputs latitude/longitude data of every bike trip from January to June 2018 from bike-share operators in Atlanta, Portland, Los Angeles, and Philadelphia. The data is organized and cleaned up using a R script and, and the route assignment between each origin-destination pair is calculated using Bing Map API tool. This poster will present the following outputs:

  1. Estimation of bike-share willingness of the four cities.
  2. The bike-share connectivity map of the bike routes of the four cities using Depthmap Software.
  3. The effectiveness of current bike infrastructures (by overlaying the origin-destination route map with the existing bike lanes).

Presenters

Chia-Huai Chang
Meng Gao

Equitable Bus Shelter Placement in Detroit

What You'll Learn

  • Understand how bus shelters are currently distributed within service areas.
  • Analyze inefficiencies in current shelter placement models.
  • Redefine bus shelter placement in an equitable fashion.

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Bus shelters are valuable assets to transit agencies as they provide riders with protection from the elements and increase rider satisfaction. In this study, a person-minute model is developed to optimize the distribution of bus shelters throughout Detroit. The methodology increases the number of riders covered in Detroit by 817 percent and demonstrates how to tackle an inefficiency present in many public transportation systems.

Presenter

Sarosh Irani

Money Talks: Communicating Transit Investment Benefits

What You'll Learn

  • Calculate some economic benefits of transit investments by leveraging peer-reviewed research in the field of transportation planning.
  • Communicate with stakeholders concerned with costs of public investment by highlighting the observed economic value created by transit systems in other regions.
  • Identify opportunities for future research that will provide a stronger foundation for predicting the economic benefits of proposed transit investments.

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Advocates for transit have pointed to increased investment in public transportation as a remedy for the congestion caused by population density spikes in some urban areas and increases in Americans' average annual vehicle miles traveled. However, the significant cost of such investments has given pause to other stakeholders more concerned about the economic bottom line. This project identifies quantifiable economic benefits of transit investment (e.g., health and safety, quality of life, and economic development) as well as opportunities for strengthening the backbone of this approach.

Presenter

Sam Shore

MoGo: Bike Sharing in Detroit

What You'll Learn

  • Understand the basics of bike sharing systems in the United States.
  • Conduct research into the ridership trends of bike share systems.
  • Work with low-income communities to expand access to bike share and other mobility options.

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We analyze the success, ridership trends, and outreach strategies of MoGo Detroit Bike Share after over a year and a half of operation. After higher than expected ridership, MoGo is growing by 50 percent in the upcoming year. What led to this success, and what lessons can be learned? Additionally, we examine current ridership trends and service area. Finally, we discuss MoGo's outreach strategies to low-income and adaptive cycling riders.

Presenter

Sarosh Irani

Does Rail Perform? A Ridership Assessment

What You'll Learn

  • Understand how projected ridership figures are used in the planning process. Participants should have a grasp of how projections support the development of a transit project.
  • Comprehend how ridership models are utilized. Participants should be able to see the varying components that are integrated in ridership models.
  • Understand how rail projections are performing. If actual ridership is not being met, participants will be able to understand what factors are causing the performance discrepancies.

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Billions of dollars are being invested in rail projects in Los Angeles. Rail ridership projections are key element in seeking funding and approval of rail projects. Research elsewhere shows that rail networks rarely meet ridership projections. This raises questions about the opportunity cost of those expenditures. This research documents the initial projections of rail segments and compares them to actual ridership to assess whether this problem is occurring in Los Angeles. The research also examines ridership modeling to determine why this may be happening. This work is intended to support efficient use of public funds.

Presenter

Lyle Janicek

Assessing Neighborhood Walkability with ArcGIS

  • Analyze walkability at the neighborhood level.
  • Understand the concept of using ArcGIS and ArcGIS Online for neighborhood planning projects.
  • Distinguish between adequate public transit access from inadequate public transit access within a neighborhood.

What You'll Learn

This project is an assessment of walkability and access to transit stops in a predominantly student neighborhood in Kalamazoo, Michigan. The research methodology used is the (SAQI) Sidewalk Availability and Quality Index that measures access to transit and walkability by assessing certain features of the built environment such as sidewalk availability and transit stops. The SAQI and GIS analysis results include walkability and transit access ratings for each road segment within the neighborhood. Analysis and results are presented as web apps created with ArcGIS Online.

Presenter

Natalie Bond

Study of University Intracampus Transit Systems

What You'll Learn

  • Compare intracampus transit systems across universities.
  • Understand what makes an effective campus transportation system.
  • Benchmark five university transportation systems across the U.S.

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Campus transit systems have developed around colleges, universities, and their surrounding areas to provide mobility solutions for students, faculty, and staff. Because of the unique needs of individual campuses, each supportive transit system is also distinct. This poster compares facility characteristics of transit system across five universities to understand emerging trends across campus transit systems and how they are adapting to meet future needs.

Presenter

Rebecca Kiriazes

Traffic Safety Improvement Program: Phase I

What You'll Learn

  • Transportation Safety.
  • Transportation Improvement.
  • Mobility.

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The purpose of this poster is to show the influence of non-motorized traffic monitoring program to estimate bicycle and pedestrian miles traveled (BMT and PMT) and measure the safety impact of bicycle and pedestrian improvements in the Corridor MPO metropolitan region of Cedar Rapids, Iowa. The project is expected to be accomplished through several phases. This poster is from Phase I of the project FY 2017-18. Moreover, the overall region BMT and PMT estimations are compared with the vehicle miles traveled (VMT), and the estimations are applied to the crash rates of bicycles, pedestrians, and motor vehicles.

Presenter

Fernando De Carvalho Oliveira Neto

Rider Behavior of E-scooter Users

What You'll Learn

  • Participants will be able to learn how to measure the speed and riding behavior of e-scooter users.
  • Participants will be able to learn just how quickly e-scooters users actual travel and how they behave along streets, sidewalks, and mixed-use paths.
  • Participants will learn the planning implications of the findings as it pertains to the planning and design of future shared-mobility infrastructure (i.e., bicycle lanes).

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While many have formed their opinions of how shared scooters operate, there is a lack of data on how electric scooter riders actually behave, and how that compares to other road users. I investigated the physical "operational characteristics" of electric scooter including include speed and other qualitative measures of behavior that might influence safety such as helmet use, riding style, group travel, and rider distraction in downtown San Jose, California. Riders travel the slowest on sidewalks when compared to mixed-use paths and streets. With regards to safety, no users wear helmets, and riders generally do not use cellphones.

Presenter

Frank Arellano

Design Guidelines for Multimodal Transit Corridors

What You'll Learn

  • Learn methods to reduce conflicts among bicyclists, buses, and pedestrians to ensure safety while maintaining efficient transit operations.
  • Explore best practices for transit operations and accommodations for transit customers and bicyclists in existing designs and for innovative facilities, such as separated bike lanes.
  • Consider how designs for transit and bicycle facilities can be integrated into a typical roadway cross-section and what bus design elements should be selected based on the contextual environment.

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The AC Transit Multimodal Guidelines were developed to support the planning and design of bicycle facilities in a way that complements bus operations. As more complete streets projects are built, it is important that these projects promote safe pedestrian and cyclist environments around bus stops, while improving travel times and reliability on bus routes. The need for the guide stems from a lack of resources on how to reduce conflicts between modes in multimodal corridors. The guide draws from local, state, and national best practices guidance to help create a more predictable, safe, and uniform experience for roadway users.

Presenter

Jesse Boudart
John Urgo
Michael Ohnemus

Injured Pedestrians: National Descriptive Analysis (2012–2016)

What You'll Learn

  • Describe current discrepancy in reported pedestrian injury numbers and actual number of injured pedestrians across the United States.
  • Recognize need for quality baseline pedestrian injury surveillance data to identify trends and evaluate program initiatives over time (e.g. Complete Streets, Vision Zero, etc.).
  • Discuss new potential areas of transportation and health research using EMS data.

More Poster Details

Effective planning for pedestrian safety relies on accurate assessment of pedestrian injuries and fatalities. While robust reporting systems exist for pedestrian fatalities, underreporting of pedestrian injuries is well documented. The National Emergency Medical Services Information System (NEMSIS) collects a convenience sample of emergency medical services (EMS) data from 49 U.S. states and territories. Our descriptive analysis of the NEMSIS Public Release Research Dataset from 2012–2016 describes patterns in demographics, temporality, urbanicity, and medical care necessity among injured pedestrians. Attendees will gain a better understanding of the national pedestrian injury burden and the benchmarking potential of EMS data.

Presenter

Katharyn Kryda

Bingo! Local Cycling Encourages Mode Shift

What You'll Learn

  • Learn how to leverage public-private partnerships to support local businesses and promote cycling within local communities.
  • Create similar programs that use gamification to encourage behavior change at the local level.
  • Think holistically about the role of active transportation in community health.

More Poster Details

"Explore your town from the seat of a bike!" The Summer Bike Challenge is an innovative 511 Contra Costa program that uses recreational bicycling to encourage long-term mode shift. Participation is free for people of all ages. Designed like a bingo card, Challenge Squares feature local destinations: parks, libraries, schools, city hall, farmers markets, and other public locations. "Free Stuff" incentives allow both easy "wins" for participants and also provide partnership opportunities between community stakeholders. Incentives include treats from local vendors, museum admissions, public swimming, and farmers' market tokens. The "Free Stuff" pop-up events also provide valuable public outreach opportunities.

Presenter

Michael Ohnemus

Electrifying Shared Mobility in Seattle

What You'll Learn

  • Upon completion, participants will be able to identify how multi-criterion decision making supported the goals of filling transit gaps, supporting shared mobility, guiding an equitable deployment, and facilitating an EV network.
  • Upon completion, participants learn about how a project oriented around mitigating emissions has connections to planning theory, 50 years after the publication of Design with Nature by Ian McHarg.
  • Upon completion, participants will be able to identify emerging data science workflows that contributed to the successful development and refinement of metrics that helped prioritize electric-vehicle charger investment.

More Poster Details

Intersecting trends of an increasingly decarbonized grid and the evolution of shared mobility services in urban areas provides a unique opportunity to reduce transport-related emissions. Fehr & Peers and Seattle DOT leveraged a McHargian decision-making process to guide an electric vehicle charger deployment that would support shared mobility, fill transit gaps, develop a robust charger network, and provide community benefits equitably. The siting model and its deployment provide a powerful example of how automation, targeted metrics, scenario oriented workflows, and value-driven decision making can help inform stakeholders about the best opportunities to electrify shared mobility systems.

Presenter

David Wasserman

Bus Rapid Transit Standards for MARTA

What You'll Learn

  • List and define the operational and design elements that will make BRT a premium transit service offering for metro Atlanta.
  • Develop a deeper understanding of the different levels and aspects of BRT service in various locations and how BRT service will vary across arterial and freeway corridors in Atlanta.
  • Understand the facilitated education and coordination between internal departments and external stakeholders in introducing a new transit mode and its design standards to a region.

More Poster Details

U.S. Census data shows that metro Atlanta is one of the fastest growing metropolitan areas in the country. Recent state legislation and local referenda have reflected a high demand for the exploration of and investment in new transit modes. Bus Rapid Transit (BRT) is a mode of transit that has taken many North American cities by storm in the past decade. Harnessing the current political momentum, MARTA is actively pursuing BRT for metro Atlanta by developing a set of BRT design standards defining BRT as a premium transit option to be added to the agency's suite of services.

Presenter

Allison Roland

Poster Presenter Policies

Review the policies carefully before submitting your poster proposal and be sure to share them with any invited presenters.

  • At least one presenter with a designated role in your poster presentation must be an APA member.
  • All poster presenters must register for the conference by February 13, 2019.
  • As a professional courtesy, speakers/presenters are encouraged to speak in no more than two sessions/posters.