2018 National Planning Conference

NPC19

NPC19 | San Francisco | April 13–16, 2019

Play a Part in the Premier Planning Event of 2019

Call for Proposals: June 1–25, 2018

The proposal submission period for NPC19 is closed.

All proposals are undergoing a peer-review to ensure that sessions chosen for the NPC19 program reflect innovation and diversity in planning research, practice, education, and professional development.

APA will notify everyone who submitted a proposal of its acceptance or rejection for the NPC19 education program in December 2018. It is the responsibility of the proposal submitter/organizer to notify other individuals named in the proposal (if any) of APA's proposal decision.

Please contact us at proposals@planning.org with any questions.

CONFERENCE REGISTRATION AND SESSION PARTICIPANT POLICIES

Below are the polices for all session submissions:

  • At least two participants with designated roles in your session must be APA members.
  • Nonmembers are welcome to be conference speakers. Nonmember speakers who wish to participate in their session only at no charge may do so by taking advantage of the guest registration option. (APA will contact nonmember speakers regarding guest registration once they have been confirmed.)
  • APA members are required to pay the member conference rate. They are not eligible for guest registration.
  • Moderators, speakers, and all other session participants must register for the conference by February 13, 2019.

As a professional courtesy, APA requests that each speaker participate in no more than two sessions.

Important Dates

June 1, 2018 Submission portal opens for session and mobile workshop proposals
June 25, 2018 Submission portal closes at noon (CT) for session and mobile workshop proposals
June 26-October 31, 2018 Proposal peer reviews
December 10, 2018 APA notifies proposers and speakers of proposal acceptance or rejection
December 12, 2018 NPC19 registration opens for APA members only
December 12, 2018 Submission portal opens for general and student poster proposals
January 4. 2019 Submission portal closes at noon (CT) for general and student poster proposals
January 9, 2019 NPC19 general registration opens
February 13, 2019 Speaker and early-bird registration deadline

Educational Tracks/Topics

Disaster Resilience and Climate Change

Climate change affects all areas of the country. Currently, major coastal cities are planning for sea-level rise, landlocked states are experiencing extreme weather and changing weather cycles, while droughts, floods, and seismic activity are occurring in new locations. Even communities that regularly focus on other planning issues should be aware of potential impacts from natural hazards and a changing climate and be ready to address them.
We invite proposals for this track that share lessons learned related to reducing vulnerability and increasing ability to withstand natural hazards; adapting local economies and land use policies, retrofitting buildings; maintaining water delivery and other public infrastructure; and enhancing emergency communication systems.

Topics within this track:

  • Climate Adaptation
  • Climate Change and Disaster Resilience for Tribal Governments
  • Climate Resilience
  • Disaster Recovery
  • Drought Resilience
  • Extreme Weather Impacts
  • Fire Prevention and Recovery
  • Hazards Planning and Mitigation
  • Impacts to on Agriculture
  • New Regional Approaches
  • Opportunities that Accompany Climate Change
  • Sea-Level Rise
  • Stormwater Management
  • Water-Supply Management

Managing Change in Communities

This track assembles a wide range of sessions on processes that are fundamental to long-range planning and that affect planning issues that concern all communities. We invite proposals that concern reurbanizing suburban communities; compatible redevelopment in older communities; revitalization; and state and federal laws that affect regional and local planning.

Topics within this track:

  • Aging Communities
  • Cities in Transition
  • Community Revitalization
  • Shared Economy
  • Short Term Rentals
  • Urbanizing Suburbia
  • Zoning to Support Micro-Economic Development

Housing, Community and Economic Development

America is confronting a housing crisis. Although the scope and specifics vary from city to city and market to market, the national reality remains that current policies are undermining the broad goal of ensuring housing choice and affordability for all. Addressing this crisis must be a priority for policy makers.

The shortage of worthy affordable housing reinforces inequality and limits access to opportunity, while meager housing options hurt the economy and constrain social and economic mobility. Good planning is essential for increasing housing options, boosting affordability, and unlocking opportunity.

We invite proposals that address these issues and offer pragmatic solutions that planners can adapt now in their communities.

Topics within this track:

  • Advancing Inclusive Growth
  • Affordable Housing Trends
  • Changes in Brick-and-Mortar Retail
  • Economic Development
  • Gentrification and Displacement
  • Housing and Community Development
  • Impacts of Federal Tax Reform
  • Innovative Finance Approaches
  • Missing Middle-Density and Workforce Housing
  • Promoting Multi-Family Housing
  • Reforming Local Codes
  • Rethinking Housing Funding and Finance
  • Updating State Planning Laws
  • Value Capture

Transportation

Transportation is changing rapidly and acquiring skills needed to keep abreast of developments in the field is critical. As urban transportation preferences evolve, transit, biking, and pedestrian travel and safety have become prime considerations impacting street design. Simultaneously, technology and personal choices are affecting transportation planning. Transportation planners must adapt.

We invite proposals that consider these issues, as well as proposals that cover large transportation planning projects — including rail and airport planning — and how they are planned and executed.

Topics within this track:

  • Active Transportation
  • Airports and Regional Rail
  • Autonomous Vehicles
  • Complete Streets
  • Evacuation Planning
  • Intelligent Transportation Systems
  • Parking Infrastructure/Reductions
  • Port and Intermodal Planning
  • Shared Mobility
  • Streets and Corridors
  • Transit
  • Transit-Oriented Development
  • Transportation for Healthy Lifestyles

Politics, Policy, and Government

Many federal, state, and local policy issues are of central concern to planners. In our currently contentious era, it's more important than ever for planners to be up-to-date on new issues and trends of thought, especially on issues likely to impact their work during the next decade. This track will offer new ideas about policy topics every planner should understand, insight into the workings of government at all levels, and a platform to support planning advocates' positions and actions on policy issues that affect local communities.

Topics within this track:

  • Activism
  • Advocacy
  • Big-City Planning
  • Comprehensive Planning
  • County Planning
  • Federal Policy Impacts
  • Federalism
  • Finance Tools
  • Improving Community Engagement
  • Lobbying
  • Management Innovations
  • Regional Planning
  • Small-City Planning
  • State-Level Planning
  • Suburban Planning
  • The U.S. Census
  • Transparent Government
  • Working with Public Officials, Boards, and Community Leaders
  • Zoning, Codes, and Ordinances

Design, Development, and Preservation

People embrace communities of lasting value that reflect historic preservation, cultural resources, community character, and exceptional urban design. Communities built on principles of interrelated patterns of land use, transportation, and urban form foster some of the most desirable characteristics of human habitation: neighborliness, sustainability, and economic efficiency. We invite proposals that address urban design, public art, historic preservation, and new urbanism.

Topics within this track:

  • Architecture
  • Creative Placemaking
  • Cultural Planning
  • Designing for Equity
  • Designing for Public Health
  • Designing for Safety
  • Historic Preservation
  • New Urbanism
  • Preserving Community Character
  • Public Art
  • Real Estate Development
  • Urban Design
  • Working Across Design Professions

Planning Practice and Careers

Wherever they are in their planning careers, planners continue to explore new career paths and special interests. This track assists planners by helping them make important career decisions (i.e. whether to pursue public- vs. private-sector employment) and ethical judgments. Proposals within this track should bring planners together to share experiences and knowledge essential to their professional development. We invite proposals that share stories addressing planners' diverse work experiences and challenges.

Topics within this track:

  • Career Advancement
  • Communication Skills
  • Design Skills
  • Discrimination in Hiring; Glass Ceilings
  • Ethics
  • Learning from Other Professions
  • Planning and Law
  • Private Practice Planning
  • Professional Certifications
  • Public Engagement Tools
  • Public Participation
  • Skills Development and Training
  • Social Media
  • The Future of APA and the Profession
  • Work Places that Support Family Life

Technology and Planning

Planners have access to more data sets and analysis tools than ever before. It's easy to feel overwhelmed. Amid the growing number of choices, how do planners determine which ones best advance their community's goals? Planners need knowledge and skills to use increasingly sophisticated tools and complex data. We invite proposals that will explore these new planning concepts and technologies.

Topics within this track:

  • Appropriate Technology
  • Coping with Rapid Technological Change
  • GIS/Geodesign
  • Open Data
  • Planning Tools
  • Smart Cities
  • Smart Communities, Artificial Intelligence, and Automation
  • Software Innovations for Planners
  • Technology for Disaster Recovery Planning
  • Using Big Data in Planning

Planning, Health, and the Natural Environment

Across the country, local governments are beginning to incorporate goals and objectives that integrate public health into all types of plans, policies, and processes. These efforts will impact how people make choices about where to live, how to get around, and how to access healthy foods and physical activity. They will affect everything from clean air and water to social equity. Through citizen engagement, plan making, capital improvements, development review, and other planning actions, planners promote fiscally sound investments and decisions that protect and restore the natural environment, conserve resources, and build more sustainable communities in both rural and urban areas.

We invite proposals that address these topics as well as environmental justice, parks, open space, and greenways. Proposals within this track will highlight local, regional, and national efforts to balance the human needs with long-term environmental viability. We encourage proposal submissions that explore how plans and regulations impact the equitable distribution of benefits associated with ecosystem services.

Topics within this track:

  • Active Living
  • Air Quality
  • Brownfields
  • Ecosystem Services and Public Health
  • Energy Conservation
  • Energy Production
  • Environmental Regulations
  • Floodplain Management
  • Food Systems
  • Green Infrastructure
  • Innovative Partnerships for Healthy Communities
  • Parks, Open Spaces, and Greenways
  • Planning Policies for Healthy Communities
  • Public Health and the Built Environment
  • Urban Agriculture
  • Water Quality
  • Wildland-Urban Interface
  • Wildlife Preservation

Planning for Inclusiveness and Social Justice

How can planners best foster socially equitable and just communities? In what ways can the profession engage resident groups and other constituencies that have historically been underrepresented in planning processes? How do we learn from community-led planning and citizen planners? How do issues of race, gender, age, ability, and sexual orientation impact planning? How can we better recruit, educate, and support planners who reflect the diversity of the communities they serve?

We invite proposals that discuss efforts to foster diversity and equity within communities and the institutions of planning. Sessions within this track may emphasize issues of particular concern to minority communities (e.g. gentrification, environmental justice); examine aspects of any planning context with a thoughtful focus on equity, diversity, or justice; or consider the concerns and special circumstances of planners with specific demographic characteristics or abilities.

Topics within this track:

  • Accessibility and Universal Design
  • Aging in Place
  • Broadband Access
  • Environmental Justice
  • Health Equity
  • Homelessness and Poverty
  • Immigrants and Refugees
  • Inclusive Public Participation and Public Involvement
  • Multigenerational Planning
  • Planning for Diverse Populations
  • Planning for Inclusive Communities
  • Post-Disaster Housing Gentrification
  • Public Health and the Built Environment
  • Redlining and Greenlining
  • Religious Land Uses
  • Safe Routes to Schools

Small Town and Rural Planning

This track assembles sessions that explore diverse rural and small-town planning topics. Examples include ensuring equal access to high-quality broadband, transportation, and utilities infrastructure; planning for rural economic development; and recognizing the importance and distinctive characteristics of small towns and rural areas. We invite proposals that explore both innovative and tried-and-true strategies to address the unique issues and opportunities facing these communities.

Topics within this track:

  • Broadband Access
  • Building Local Leadership
  • Distributed Utilities
  • Impact of Sprawl on Service Delivery
  • New Ruralism
  • Revitalizing Main Street
  • Rural Growth and Change
  • Rural-Urban Synergies
  • Sharing Economy and Small Towns
  • Small-Town and Rural Disaster Recovery

International, Comparative, and Global Planning

Rapid urbanization, cross-border movement of people and goods, and global environmental challenges have made the planning world smaller. How can our communities respond to global pressures? How can planners respond to global problems?
We invite proposals that explore international challenges of development, channels for international movement of planning ideas, urbanization, environmental pollution, and climate change in different countries and in international agencies and compacts. We encourage proposal submissions that discuss innovative and successful responses to informality, land tenure, migration, disaster resilience, artificial intelligence, varying legal frameworks, and emerging concepts such as the Right to the City.  

Topics within this track:

  • City Annexations
  • Global Movement of Planning Ideas and Practices
  • Informality
  • Infrastructure Development
  • International and Comparative Planning Innovations
  • International Law and Organizations
  • Land Reform
  • Migration and Refugees
  • New Urban Agenda
  • Planning for Humanitarian Emergencies
  • Planning in Conflict Zones
  • Right to the City
  • Sustainable Development
  • Transboundary Planning
  • Urbanization

Academic and Professional Research

How can research aimed at understanding and improving planning practice bring planning researchers and planning practitioners closer together? Whether conducted by scholars or practitioners, proposals in this track should include researchers and the planners who served as subjects of the research or who experimented with implementing the results of research.

We invite proposals that contain research seeking to better understand cities, imagine improved planning systems, re-interpret planning's past, develop new planning approaches, or assess the impact of plans. We encourage proposals that provide for interaction between researchers and those impacted by research.

Topics within this track:

  • Cities, Environments, and Communities
  • Governance, Participation, and Institutions
  • Planning History and Theory
  • Planning Law and Plan Implementation
  • Planning Methods
  • Research on Planning Practice
  • Research Prepared for Practice Clients

Session Types

Educational Session

Propose a 75-minute presentation concerned with any facet of planning that appears in the list of NPC19 Educational Tracks and Topics.

How to fill 75 minutes with educational content is up to the proposer. Possible session formats include a debate, an interactive conversation with the audience, or a panel discussion. Consider a facilitated group discussion or a presentation that incorporates research.

Ethics Educational Session

Propose a 90-minute presentation concerned with any facet of planning that appears in the list of NPC19 Educational Tracks and Topics.

To qualify for 1.5 Certification Maintenance ethics credits, the proposal must demonstrate that the content focuses on training planners on the standards of ethical behavior outlined in the AICP Code of Ethics and Professional Conduct. While general ethics courses, local ethics laws, and ethics codes from other professions also may include relevant issues, the AICP Code focuses on a system of moral principles specific to professional planners.

Law Educational Session

Propose a 90-minute presentation concerned with any facet of planning that appears in the list of NPC19 Educational Tracks and Topics.

To qualify for 1.5 Certification Maintenance law credits, the proposal must demonstrate that the content is related to an aspect of planning law, such as environmental law, land use law, redevelopment law, administrative law, or housing law. Content submitted for law-credit CM eligibility must be closely related to recently enacted planning legislation, recent (within the last 10 years) case decisions, or trends in existing planning laws or case decisions. Training on law must constitute a majority of proposed session content.

Educational Session with local focus

Propose a 75-minute presentation concerned with any facet of planning that appears in the list of NPC19 Educational Tracks and Topics. Presentations in this category must relate to the San Francisco Bay Area and Northern California.

Deep Dive Session

When your subject matter is very broad, requires in-depth presentations, or is ripe for enhanced audience involvement, propose a comprehensive, highly interactive session that can include lectures, hands-on learning, debates, creative attendee engagement, and useful resources for participants. Deep Dives last 2.5 hours — twice as long as regular sessions.

Deep Dive Session with Ethics Focus

See "Deep Dive Session," above.

Propose a 150-minute presentation concerned with any facet of planning that appears in the list of NPC19 Educational Tracks and Topics.

To qualify for 1.5 Certification Maintenance ethics credits, the proposal must demonstrate that the content focuses on training planners on the standards of ethical behavior outlined in the AICP Code of Ethics and Professional Conduct. While general ethics courses, local ethics laws, and ethics codes from other professions also may include relevant issues, the AICP Code focuses on a system of moral principles specific to professional planners.

Deep Dive Session with Legal Focus

See "Deep Dive Session," above.

Propose a 150-minute presentation concerned with any facet of planning that appears in the list of NPC19 Educational Tracks and Topics.

To qualify for 1.5 Certification Maintenance law credits, the proposal must demonstrate that the content is related to an aspect of planning law, such as environmental law, land use law, redevelopment law, administrative law, or housing law. Content submitted for law-credit CM eligibility must be closely related to recently enacted planning legislation, recent (within the last 10 years) case decisions, or trends in existing planning laws or case decisions. Training on law must constitute a majority of proposed session content.

Deep Dive Session with Local Focus

See "Deep Dive Session," above.

Presentations in this category must relate to the San Francisco Bay Area and Northern California.

Fast, Funny, and Passionate

Seven to 10 of these bite-sized (seven-minute) presentations occur during a standard 75-minute session. Typically, a presentation is based on a personal project or short visual essay. Capture the flavor of today's planning by making your audience laugh — and think. Submit a humorous and engaging five-to-seven minute Fast, Funny, and Passionate presentation and we will assemble it with others into a session that informs, captivates, and entertains the audience.

Mobile Workshop

Propose a mobile workshop that takes attendees to a planning project or projects in the host city or surrounding region. Attendees should learn about local planning challenges, best practices, and community impacts. Typically led by planners, mobile workshops offer the opportunity to explore behind-the-scenes planning initiatives with a planner's perspective on local challenges.

Session Formats

In order to coordinate the room setup with the educational content, proposal submitters will be asked to indicate their session format.

Note: Although we do our best to accommodate the session formats of selected proposals, we cannot guarantee that your session format will result in the exact room setup described below.

Panel Discussion with Attendee Engagement

In a panel discussion, the organizer plays a very active role, moderating a two- or three-person panel and ensuring that all panelists have the opportunity to speak. The moderator can pose questions and facilitate audience questions. Panel discussions should generate spontaneous interaction among panelists and between panelists and the audience. Diverse perspectives among panelists is important to the session's success.

A proposal that includes a panel discussion should describe the session structure or format, the issues or themes to be discussed, and some key questions that will either be addressed primarily by the panel or supplemented with audience questions. Be sure to describe how your session will engage the audience.

Panel Discussions usually are set in theater-style seating with a stage containing a podium and head table with four chairs. Presentations are run from the stage/podium and audience members use a microphone on a stand placed among them.

Session Debate

A debate is an engaging way to present opposing views about a topic. Generally, a debate includes a moderator and presenters to represent each side of a controversial topic. The debate may consist of the moderator stating a proposition followed by one side presenting affirming arguments and the other side presenting dissenting arguments. Alternatively, the moderator may pose pointed questions to which each debater responds with his or her views on the topic. The debate can incorporate time for rebuttal and audience questions.

When submitting a proposal with a debate, please describe the topic, participants, format, major points likely to be argued or the questions to be posed, and the debaters' expertise vis-à-vis the topic.

Session Debates usually are set in theater-style seating. A pre-debate presentation, if there is one, will be run from the stage/podium. For the debate portion, two easels will be set in the front of the room. Each presenter will be given a wireless lavalier mic and present/debate near one of the easels. Audience members will engage by using a microphone on a stand placed among them.

Interactive Conversation with the Audience

Typically, one or two experts on a topic serve as hosts. This session type is well suited to helping attendees with current problems, discussing new developments in an area of concern, and building networks among people with similar interests. These sessions usually begin with explanatory or introductory information and move on to involve the audience in an activity.

Proposals for conversation-style sessions should name the topic, explain why it is appropriate for this session, name one or two experts to serve as hosts, and describe the expertise of each host vis-à-vis the topic. Although the expert host(s) may make a short opening presentation, the majority of time should be devoted to answering questions from the audience and promoting discussion and networking.

An Interactive Conversation With the Audience usually is set in theater-style seating. A presentation, if there is one, will be run from the stage/podium. The audience activity can be conducted by dividing the attendees into groups and asking groups to move to identified areas of the room to meet and discuss. Each presenter will be given two handheld mics and move among the audience to pose or answer questions. Audience members will engage by using presenters' handhelds mic or the microphone stand placed among them.

Facilitated Group Discussion

This format is designed to facilitate wide audience participation and sustained discussion. It often produces a progression of ideas since dialogue can flow freely. It is, therefore, a very useful session format for brainstorming and developing works in progress. This session type also is well suited for small-group discussions of hot topics and new developments and for developing networks among people with similar interests. A facilitated group discussion offers participants the opportunity to hear and learn from industry colleagues and to tackle common business issues. Deep Dive sessions typically are presented in a facilitated group discussion format.

Facilitated group discussion proposals should preview the topic sand list the themes or questions to be presented to the audience/groups. The proposal should explain why the topics are appropriate for this session type and describe the expertise of each facilitator vis-à-vis the topics or themes.

A Facilitated Group Discussion can take place in a preset room of either theater-style seating or with semi-circular tables. A presentation, if there is one, will be run from the stage/podium. The audience group discussion can be conducted by dividing the attendees into groups and asking groups to move to identified areas of the room to meet and discuss. Each presenter will be given two handheld mics and move among the audience to pose or answer questions. Audience members will engage by using presenters' handhelds mic or the microphone stand placed among them. Note: selection of this session format does not guarantee rounded tables in your room. Only Deep Dive sessions are guaranteed round tables.

Other

Congratulations! You have thought outside the box and come up with an innovative and engaging way to present your session content to our audience. Be sure to provide a detailed description of your plans in the outline section of your proposal. If your proposal is approved as an NPC19 session, we will work with you to determine the most appropriate room setup to make this session successful.

Session Participant Roles

For any proposal to be considered, at least two participants must be APA members.

Session Organizer Only

This person is an APA member who submits the proposal on behalf of the speakers. The Session Organizer Only will not attend the conference and will not be required to register. He or she is responsible for completing the proposal requirements and confirming the speakers' participation prior to submitting the proposal. The Session Organizer Only is the only person authorized to request the addition or removal of speakers and other session updates.

  • Submits the proposal
  • Will not speak at the session or attend NPC19
  • Is not required to register for the conference

Session Organizer and Speaker

This person is an APA member who submits the proposal and will speak at the session. The Session Organizer and Speaker will attend the conference and is required to register. He or she is responsible for completing the proposal requirements and confirming the speakers' participation prior to submitting the proposal. The Session Organizer and Speaker is the only person authorized to request the addition or removal of speakers and other session updates.

  • Submits the proposal
  • Will speak at the session and attend NPC19
  • Is required to register for the conference

Speaker

This person may be an APA member or nonmember. A Speaker will attend the conference and is required to register. A Speaker is not authorized to request addition or removal of other speakers or other session updates.

  • Will speak at the session and attend NPC19
  • Is required to register for the conference

Session Organizer and Moderator

This person is an APA member who submits the proposal on behalf of the speakers and will preside over the session. The Session Organizer and Moderator will attend the conference and is required to register. He or she is responsible for completing the proposal requirements and confirming the speakers' participation prior to submitting the proposal. The Session Organizer and Moderator is the only person authorized to request the addition or removal of speakers and other session updates.

  • Submits proposal
  • Will moderate the session and attend NPC19
  • Is required to register for the conference

Moderator

This person may be an APA member or nonmember. The Moderator will attend the conference and is required to register. A Moderator will only preside over the session and is not authorized to request addition or removal of other speakers or other session updates.

  • Will moderate the session and attend NPC19
  • Is required to register for the conference

guides

APA recommends preparing a draft of your proposal, using the appropriate instructions below, before beginning the online proposal submission process.

Proposal Tips and Tricks

Drafting an Educational Session Proposal

Drafting a Deep Dive Session Proposal

Drafting a Fast, Funny, and Passionate Session Proposal

How to Submit an Educational Session Proposal

How to Submit a Deep Dive Session Proposal

How to Submit a Fast, Funny, and Passionate Session Proposal