Hazards Planning Center

Planning Information Exchange Webinars

Planning for Drought and Cascading Hazards

August 15, 2019

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CM | 1.25

The 19th webinar in the series features discussions from Cody Knutson, research professor and drought planning coordinator at the National Drought Mitigation Center, and Jeff Brislawn, CFM, hazard mitigation and emergency management consultant with Wood Environment and Infrastructure Solutions. They will discuss approaches to assessing and integrating drought into local hazard mitigation planning. Joe DeAngelis, AICP, senior research associate with the American Planning Association will moderate as participants learn about:

  • Specific challenges and opportunities in planning for drought and cascading natural hazards
  • Practical approaches to assessing local and regional drought vulnerability
  • Methods for integrating drought and drought-related impacts into multi-hazard mitigation planning
  • Resources and tools that can help planners and floodplain managers plan for drought in a multi-hazards context

Meet the Presenters

Headshot of Cody Knutson
Presenter

Cody Knutson

Cody Knutson is a Research Professor and the Drought Planning Coordinator at the National Drought Mitigation Center, within the School of Natural Resources at the University of Nebraska-Lincoln. With a background in social science and water resources, his work focuses on understanding how people and systems are vulnerable to drought and collaboratively developing strategies, tools, and plans to minimize their drought risk. He’s worked on these activities with agricultural producers, communities, tribes, states, and the federal government for more than 20 years.

Headshot of Jeff Brislawn
Presenter

Jeff Brislawn, CFM

Jeff Brislawn is a hazard mitigation and emergency management consultant with Wood Environment and Infrastructure Solutions (formerly Amec Foster Wheeler) and has over 27 years of related experience for state and local governments across the United States. Brislawn's background includes 12 years of public sector experience including work for the Colorado Office of Emergency Management and FEMA. He has assisted numerous state, local, and federal clients with hazard risk assessment and related resiliency planning including multi-hazard mitigation plans, drought mitigation and response plans, dam failure evacuation plans, and local emergency operations plans. Brislawn has an MS in Geology from Colorado State University and a BS in Geology from Ohio University and is a Certified Floodplain Manager.

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Moderator

Joe DeAngelis, AICP

Joe DeAngelis is a planner and senior research associate with the American Planning Association in Chicago, where he focuses on climate adaptation, natural hazard risk, and community resilience. DeAngelis received his planning degree from CUNY-Hunter College, where he researched post-Hurricane Sandy recovery and long-term community adaptation. He has worked for the New York City Mayor’s Office, the National Park Service, and as a Resiliency Planner with the New York City Department of City Planning. DeAngelis is currently the project manager for a U.S. Forest Service-funded project focused on regional green infrastructure planning, and a NOAA-funded project focused on integrating climate science into local planning, and is also the co-editor of Zoning Practice, a monthly APA publication.

Go Green With GASB 62!

April 25, 2019

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CM | 1.5

Investments in distributed water strategies, including conservation/restoration projects and green infrastructure, can generate both water quality and flood loss reduction benefits. However, these initiatives are usually limited in scope and scale as they are funded as "annual expenses" in accordance with conventional accounting rules.

Recently, those accounting rules have been expanded to make it easier for cities, towns, and other public entities to finance decentralized projects. The General Accounting Standards Board (GASB)'s Statement 62, along with the new 2018 Implementation Guidance, provides a path forward for public utilities opting to capitalize expenses in distributed infrastructure. This new guidance has the potential for unlocking millions in new investment for funding green infrastructure and stormwater solutions, jumpstarting greater community resilience.

ASFPM Executive Director Chad Berginnis will moderate as Cynthia Koehler, executive director of the Water Now Alliance, and Janet Clements, an economist with Corona Environmental Consulting, discuss this new implementation guidance and its potential impacts. Specifically, the webinar will discuss:

  • How the new GASB Guidance can support green stormwater infrastructure
  • What you need to know to take advantage of the opportunity to use capital to scale up investment in decentralized projects
  • Case studies from around the country where communities are starting to invest in decentralized systems
  • Tap into Resilience, WaterNow's new website dedicated to helping communities and practitioners learn about and implement onsite, localized water strategies with tools, resources, and connections to experts

Meet the Presenters

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Presenter

Cynthia Koehler

Cynthia Koehler is the co-founder and executive director of the WaterNow Alliance, a nonprofit network of water leaders dedicated to catalyzing sustainable water solutions in communities across the West. She is an environmental attorney and water policy expert with 20 years of experience working on California and federal water policy, and was previously the Legislative Director for California water issues for the Environmental Defense Fund, and Legal Director for Save San Francisco Bay Association. Koehler has also served on the Board of the Marin Municipal Water District Board for the last decade and is currently Board President. She is the recipient of various awards, including The Bay Institute's Hero of the Bay Award, and serves on the Board of the Water Education Foundation among other organizations. Koehler holds a BA from Pomona College in Claremont, California, and JD and Environmental Law Certificate from the University of Oregon School of Law.

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Presenter

Janet Clements

Janet Clements specializes in water resources planning and natural resource and environmental economics. She conducts benefit-cost, triple-bottom line (TBL), and economic impact analyses to evaluate the economic, social, and environmental implications of policies and programs. Clements is a noted economic expert in the water sector, specifically in the fields of integrated water resource management, water supply planning, green infrastructure, and affordability of water and wastewater services. She also works on climate vulnerability and adaptation planning in relation to water resources, assesses the value of climate services and information, and has extensive experience analyzing water use and trends across sectors. Clements has led several studies to assess the non-market benefits of water resources and related programs.

Moderator

Chad Berginnis, CFM

Chad Berginnis became executive director of ASFPM in July 2012 after joining the the organization in 2011. Since 2000, he has served ASFPM as insurance committee chair, mitigation policy committees' coordinator, vice chair, and chair. Berginnis received his Bachelor of Science in natural resources from Ohio State University. Since 1993, his work has focused on floodplain management, hazard mitigation, and land-use planning at the state, local, and private sector level.

Flood Economics

February 13, 2019

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The 17th webinar in the series involves discussions from Hilary Steiner and Anil Sarda of The Economist Intelligence Unit, a forecasting and research arm of the Economist Group, publisher of The Economist newspaper. They discuss their research into the economics of flood mitigation and associated best practices for communities nationwide. Shannon Burke, manager of APA’s Hazards Planning Center, moderates the discussion. This webinar addresses new insights into flood loss avoidance based on a series of community case studies, a wide-ranging analysis into over 20,000 flood mitigation projects spanning all 50 states and Puerto Rico, the business case for flood mitigation, and vital lessons learned from planners and floodplain professionals on the economics of flood mitigation.

Browse the Flood Economics website

Meet the Presenters

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Presenter

Hilary Steiner

Hilary Steiner is the global director for the Public Policy practice of The Economist Intelligence Unit. She leads a global team of consultants, focusing on developing provocative and impactful programs for clients. Hilary has expertise in evidence-driven policy advocacy, with a particular focus on transnational policy and global norms. She has led the Flood Economics program since its inception in 2015 and has presented its findings at events across the US, including at the National Hurricane Conference, and acted as the moderator for the virtual event Building Resilience: Investing in Mitigation to Reduce Risk.

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Presenter

Anil Sarda

Anil Sarda is a senior analyst with the Public Policy practice of The Economist Intelligence Unit. He is an experienced project manager and analyst responsible for overseeing economic impact assessments, cost-benefit analyses and policy benchmarking studies across the world. Anil has worked on the Flood Economics program since its inception in 2015 and now manages the program, most recently overseeing the completion of four case studies covering the value of building codes and how US homeowners can build back stronger. He was the lead analyst in the research and data analysis behind the Community Case Studies, an in-depth look into 21 communities across the US that have mitigated their flood risk through different actions and funding mechanisms.

Headshot of Shannon Burke.
Moderator

Shannon Burke

As manager of APA's Hazards Planning Center, Shannon Burke oversees research projects within the center, works to secure future funding, and builds partnerships with organizations working to advance resiliency. Burke has more than 20 years of experience as a hazard mitigation consultant, FEMA specialist, and local government planner for several jurisdictions in Louisiana, including the City of New Orleans Mayor's Office and City Planning Commission. Burke's family was directly impacted by Hurricane Katrina in 2005, an experience that continues to motivate and guide her work in hazards planning. Because of Katrina, Burke has a particular interest in the power of planning to alleviate the impact of disasters on vulnerable and underserved populations. She has a Master of Science degree from the University of New Orleans College of Urban and Public Affairs and a Bachelor of Arts degree from Louisiana State University. She is also a board member of the National Hazards Mitigation Association.

Research Topics in Disasters, Hazard Mitigation, and Resilience

October 9, 2018

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Many of the top universities in the United States invest time, energy and financial resources into researching the issues that come with natural disasters. Indeed, several universities have founded entire disaster research centers to draw conclusions from data and make recommendations for hazard mitigation practices. This webinar convened national experts and thought leaders from three universities — the University of Colorado’s Natural Hazards Center, the University of North Carolina's Coastal Resilience Center, and Texas A&M University to lay out the scope and discuss the implications of current research into disasters, hazard mitigation and resilience

Meet the Presenters

ASFPM Executive Director Chad Berginnis, moderated as Lori Peek, Director of the Natural Hazards Center and professor in the Department of Sociology at the University of Colorado Boulder, Sam Brody, Regents Professor and holder of the George P. Mitchell ’40 Chair in Sustainable Coasts at Texas A&M University, and Gavin Smith, Director of the Department of Homeland Security’s Coastal Resilience Center of Excellence at the University of North Carolina discuss the most exciting, up-to-date hazard mitigation and resilience research being undertaken by each of their organizations. In this webinar the presenters discussed:

  • Acquainting practicing planners and floodplain managers with some of the leading research on these topics and the resources that their universities have to offer.
  • The data needed to better prepare and plan for the wildfire/flood dynamic
  • Understanding where the problems are now to mitigate wildfire risk
  • Communicating risk and taking actions in rural communities and urban environments, including the use of FEMA’s Flood after Fire Toolkit

Presenter

Lori Peek

Lori Peek is director of the Natural Hazards Center and professor in the Department of Sociology at the University of Colorado Boulder. She studies vulnerable populations in disaster and is author of Behind the Backlash: Muslim Americans after 9/11, co-editor of Displaced: Life in the Katrina Diaspora, and co-author of Children of Katrina. Lori helped develop school safety guidance for the nation, which resulted in the publication of FEMA P-1000, Safer, Stronger, Smarter: A Guide to Improving School Natural Hazard Safety. Peek, who is president of the Research Committee on Disasters for the International Sociological Association, has conducted long term investigations in the aftermath of several major disasters. She is currently leading a National Science Foundation project to establish Social Science Extreme Events Reconnaissance (SSEER) and Interdisciplinary Science and Engineering Extreme Events Reconnaissance (ISEEER) networks for the disaster community.

Presenter

Sam Brody

Samuel D. Brody is a Regents Professor and holder of the George P. Mitchell ’40 Chair in Sustainable Coasts in the Departments of Marine Sciences and Landscape Architecture and Urban Planning at Texas A&M University. He is the Director of Center for Texas Beaches and Shores and the Lead Technical Expert for the Governor’s Commission to Rebuild Texas. Brody’s research focuses on coastal environmental planning, spatial analysis, flood mitigation, climate change policy, and natural hazards mitigation. He has published numerous scientific articles on flood risk and mitigation, and recently authored the book, Rising Waters: The causes and consequences of flooding in the United States published by Cambridge University Press. Brody teaches graduate courses in environmental planning, flood mitigation, and coastal resiliency. He has also worked in both the public and private sectors to help local coastal communities adopt flood mitigation plans.

Presenter

Gavin Smith

Gavin Smith is an Associate Research Professor in the Department of City and Regional Planning at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. Dr. Smith is also the Director of the Department of Homeland Security Coastal Resilience Center of Excellence (UNC Coastal Resilience Center) and the Department of Homeland Security’s Center of Excellence — Coastal Hazards Center. The UNC Hazards Center research focus areas include: modeling, land use planning, technology applications, the social implications of hazards and disasters, environmental hazards management, law and policy, public health, business, and economics. The Coastal Hazards Center research focus areas include: hazard modeling, engineering, human behavior, and land use planning. Smith is currently engaged in planning-related research within the center, focused on a national evaluation of local and state hazard mitigation plans, as well as the study of disaster recovery plans and policies.

Moderator

Chad Berginnis, CFM

Chad Berginnis became executive director of ASFPM in July 2012 after joining the the organization in 2011. Since 2000, he has served ASFPM as insurance committee chair, mitigation policy committees' coordinator, vice chair, and chair. Berginnis received his Bachelor of Science in natural resources from Ohio State University. Since 1993, his work has focused on floodplain management, hazard mitigation, and land-use planning at the state, local, and private sector level.

Flood Risk Reduction: Putting Planning into Practice

July 18, 2018

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Moving toward plan implementation is often a difficult step for communities, especially with regard to flood hazard mitigation. However, ensuring that plans are well-integrated, policies are mutually supportive, and codes and ordinances align with community goals all play a major role in a community's aspirations of resilience.

Meet the Presenters

Shannon Burke, manager of APA's Hazards Planning Center will moderate as Tanya M. Stern, deputy director for planning, engagement, and design with the District of Columbia Office of Planning, and Seth Jensen, principal planner with the Lamoille County (Vermont) Planning Commission, discuss how their communities have used tools such as plan-making, zoning and subdivision ordinances, and locally integrated policies to actualize flood disaster resilience in a land use context.

Participants will learn :

  • How to adapt plans for on the ground realities
  • Specific land use policies that promote flood resilience, and
  • How to coordinate within regions and local governments to realize long-term community resilience

Presenter

Tanya Stern

Tanya Washington Stern is the deputy director for planning, engagement, and design at the DC Office of Planning. She is leading the integration of the topic of resilience into Washington, D.C'.s comprehensive plan for the first time. Stern also partners with district, regional, and federal agencies on climate adaptation, resilience, and flood management initiatives. In addition, she is a key agency partner for Washington, D.C.'s 100 Resilient Cities initiative. She previously served as office's chief of staff and was the project manager for the 2013 Height Master Plan. Stern has served in the government of the District of Columbia since 2004 and has held positions in the Executive Office of the Mayor, the Office of Property Management, and the Department of Parks and Recreation. She also has over 10 years of nonprofit experience. Stern holds a master's degree in City Planning from the University of Pennsylvania and Six Sigma Green Belt certification, and she is a Certified Public Manager.

Presenter

Seth Jensen

Seth Jensen is a lifelong resident of Vermont and has served as a volunteer on his local planning commission since 2005. Professionally, Jensen is the principal planner at the Lamoille County Planning Commission. Lamoille County is a predominately rural region in North/Central Vermont. Due to its topography of narrow river valleys bounded by steep hillsides, and historic development pattern of villages constructed near river confluences, Lamoille County is particularly vulnerable to flooding. Since three major floods inundated the Village of Jeffersonville, Jensen has worked with the community to integrate flood mitigation with other aspects of land use, transportation, and economic development planning.

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Moderator

Shannon Burke

As manager of APA's Hazards Planning Center, Shannon Burke oversees research projects within the center, works to secure future funding, and builds partnerships with organizations working to advance resiliency. Burke has more than 20 years of experience as a hazard mitigation consultant, FEMA specialist, and local government planner for several jurisdictions in Louisiana, including the City of New Orleans Mayor's Office and City Planning Commission. Burke's family was directly impacted by Hurricane Katrina in 2005, an experience that continues to motivate and guide her work in hazards planning. Because of Katrina, Burke has a particular interest in the power of planning to alleviate the impact of disasters on vulnerable and underserved populations. She has a Master of Science degree from the University of New Orleans College of Urban and Public Affairs and a Bachelor of Arts degree from Louisiana State University. She is also a board member of the a National Hazards Mitigation Association.

The Fire/Flood Dynamic

May 15, 2018

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2017 was a grim year for wildfires. Over 1 million acres burned in Montana and in California. Nearly 9,000 wildfires burned 1.2 million acres of land destroying over 10,000 structures and killing at least 46 people. Then in 2018, more than 30,000 people were ordered to evacuate in Santa Barbara County as an atmospheric river rain event occurred in the same wildfire-ravaged area. Sadly another 21 people lost their lives as a result of flooding and mudflows.

Flood risk grows significantly in areas burned by wildfires and human encroachment into these areas means lives and property is at stake. Yet there are things that can be done by property owners and local and state officials to lessen the risk.

Meet the Presenters

ASFPM Executive Director Chad Berginnis moderated as Michele Steinberg, manager of the National Fire Protection Association’s (NFPA) Wildfire Division, and Traci Sears, Montana’s state floodplain manager & NFIP state coordinator, discussed:

  • How the aftermath of wildfires contributes to flooding problems, including mudflows
  • The data needed to better prepare and plan for the wildfire/flood dynamic
  • Understanding where the problems are now to mitigate wildfire risk
  • Communicating risk and taking actions in rural communities and urban environments, including the use of FEMA’s Flood after Fire Toolkit

Presenter

Traci Sears, CFM

Traci Sears, CFM, serves as the NFIP/CAP coordinator for the State of Montana in Helena. Her duties include conducting training workshops around the state, working with NFIP communities, conducting Community Assistance Visits (CAVs), and working on various projects through the state floodplain program. Previously, Sears was a planner for Flathead County Planning & Zoning Office in Kalispell for six years. Her duties included subdivision review, Conditional Use Application Reviews, Lakeshore Program, managing the county floodplain program and the CRS program, and working on the county’s first Flood Awareness Week. Sears received a BA in Criminal Justice from Florida Atlantic University.

Presenter

Michele Steinberg

Michele Steinberg is the division manager for Wildland Fire Operations at the National Fire Protection Association (NFPA), where she leads a team dedicated to wildfire safety education, advocacy, and outreach. From 2002 to 2013, she oversaw the development and implementation of the national Firewise Communities/USA Recognition Program. Previously, she served as special projects manager for the Insurance Institute for Business & Home Safety (IBHS), hazard mitigation specialist for the Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) New England regional office, and regional planner for the Massachusetts Flood Hazard Management Program. She is the author of numerous articles and technical documents on disaster safety and mitigation planning, and currently serves on the executive committee of the American Planning Association's Hazard Mitigation and Disaster Recovery Planning Division. Steinberg holds a BA in English and American Literature from Brandeis University and a Master of Urban Affairs degree from Boston University.

Moderator

Chad Berginnis, CFM

Chad Berginnis became executive director of ASFPM in July 2012 after joining the the organization in 2011. Since 2000, he has served ASFPM as insurance committee chair, mitigation policy committees' coordinator, vice chair, and chair. Berginnis received his Bachelor of Science in natural resources from Ohio State University. Since 1993, his work has focused on floodplain management, hazard mitigation, and land-use planning at the state, local, and private sector level.

Flood Hazard Mitigation in Historic Districts

January 31, 2018

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Historic communities and districts face a number of challenges when attempting to mitigate flood hazards. The 13th webinar in the PIE series features a presentation on flood hazard mitigation in historic districts by Louisette Leonard Scott, AICP, CFM, director of planning and development for the City of Mandeville, Louisiana. Shannon Burke, manager of APA's Hazards Planning Center, will moderate.

Meet the Presenters

Louisette Scott will discuss:

  • Keeping the historic context of your community intact while reducing risk through hazard mitigation
  • Embracing mitigation to protect historic properties
  • Local issues faced by planners when dealing with design standards and flood hazard areas
  • The various problems faced by homeowners associations when dealing with long-term flood hazards

Presenter

Louisette Scott, AICP, CFM

Louisette Scott is the director of the Department of Planning and Development for the City of Mandeville, Louisiana, with over 30 years experience in city planning. As planning director, she is integrally involved in developing and administering the city's regulations regarding all planning/zoning issues and subdivision development. The City of Mandeville has enjoyed a reputation for being proactive in landscaping, tree preservation, signage, and lighting regulations, as well as design guideline overlay districts. In 2012, the city adopted a Historic Preservation District which will continue to help in defining and preserving Mandeville's historic character. As a coastal community, Mandeville has been addressing challenges with FEMA requirements and their impact upon the loal historic context. Scott has been influential in coordinating the design review process with local architects to meet the challenges of architectural design, historic context, and flood hazard mitigation.

Headshot of Shannon Burke.
Presenter

Shannon Burke

As manager of APA's Hazards Planning Center, Shannon Burke oversees research projects within the center, works to secure future funding, and builds partnerships with organizations working to advance resiliency. Burke has more than 20 years of experience as a hazard mitigation consultant, FEMA specialist, and local government planner for several jurisdictions in Louisiana, including the City of New Orleans Mayor's Office and City Planning Commission. Burke's family was directly impacted by Hurricane Katrina in 2005, an experience that continues to motivate and guide her work in hazards planning. Because of Katrina, Burke has a particular interest in the power of planning to alleviate the impact of disasters on vulnerable and underserved populations. She has a Master of Science degree from the University of New Orleans College of Urban and Public Affairs and a Bachelor of Arts degree from Louisiana State University. She is also a board member of the a National Hazards Mitigation Association.

Plan Integration for Resilience Scorecard

October 4, 2017

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A community may have a large number of plans addressing a variety of issues: housing, economic development, parks/open space, land use, emergency response, and hazard mitigation are just some of them. The question is, are all of these plans aligned to accomplish your community's resiliency goals? Or are they at cross-purposes with each other?

Meet the Presenters

ASFPM Executive Director Chad Berginnis, moderated as Jaimie Hicks Masterson, associate director of Texas Target Communities, and Phillip Berke, PhD, director of the Institute of Sustainable Coastal Communities through Texas A&M University, discussed an exciting research project and tools being developed for the practitioner community. The project will spatially evaluate networks of plans to reduce hazard vulnerability. In this webinar they discussed:

  • The reason local plans are inconsistent and show how local plans are coordinated
  • How to identify incongruities within networks of plans
  • Using the Plan Integration for Resilience (PIRS) process to provide communities developing/updating plans with a guidance framework to reduce future hazard exposure and better align plans and policies
  • Preliminary results of using the PIRS process in Norfolk, Virginia

Presenter

Jaimie Hicks Masterson

Jaimie Hicks Masterson is associate director of Texas Target Communities (TTC) at Texas A&M University. She develops community training curriculum on community resilience, vulnerability and asset mapping, city planning, and hazard reduction and mitigation. Masterson received her Master of Urban Planning from Texas A&M University and earned a Certificate in Environmental Hazard Management. Her thesis received first prize in the Engineering and Architecture Category for Student Research Week, the Melbern G. Glasscock Humanities Award, and second prize for the Vice President of Research Diversity Award. She also has background and experience in landscape architecture, urban design, and environmental design and received her Bachelor of Landscape Architecture from Texas A&M University.

Presenter

Philip Berke, PhD

Philip Berke is a professor of land use and environmental planning in the Department of Landscape Architecture and Urban Planning, and Director of the Institute of Sustainable Coastal Communities at College Station. His work lies at the intersection of land use planning, urban ecology, and community resilience to environmental hazards. Berke is the co-recipient of several best article awards and honorable mention awards from the Journal of the American Planning Association, co-author of a book selected as one of the 100 Essential Books in Planning for the 20th Century by the American Planning Association, and was a Senior Fulbright Scholar in New Zealand. In 2013, he received the Award for Excellence in Doctoral Student Mentoring by the University of North Carolina Graduate School. Berke's research is currently supported by grants from the National Science Foundation and Department of Homeland Security Science and Technology Directorate.

Moderator

Chad Berginnis, CFM

Chad Berginnis became executive director of ASFPM in July 2012 after joining the the organization in 2011. Since 2000, he has served ASFPM as insurance committee chair, mitigation policy committees' coordinator, vice chair, and chair. Berginnis received his Bachelor of Science in natural resources from Ohio State University. Since 1993, his work has focused on floodplain management, hazard mitigation, and land-use planning at the state, local, and private sector level.

Naturally Resilient Communities

May 30, 2017

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Green infrastructure can play a crucial role in helping to reduce flood risk, while also providing a wide variety of additional benefits, including improved water quality, enhanced recreational opportunities, and wildlife habitat. In this webinar, planning professionals from Miami-Dade County, Florida; Milwaukee; and Pierce County, Washington, will discuss how they are using green infrastructure to address community flood risk.

This webinar will also feature a description and demonstration of the Naturally Resilient Communities web-based tools that can help your community plan for green infrastructure.

Meet the Presenters

APA Hazards Planning Center Manager Jim Schwab, FAICP, will moderate as Nate Woiwode (The Nature Conservancy), Katie Hagemann (Miami-Dade County Office of Resilience), Karen Sands (Milwaukee Metropolitan Sewerage District), Jacob Pedersen (Pierce County, Washington), and Jill Dixon (Sasaki Associates) discuss:

  • The benefits of green infrastructure in managing flood risk and cultivating community co-benefits.
  • Green infrastructure case studies of Miami-Dade County, Milwaukee, and Pierce County.
  • The Nature Conservancy's new web-based tool to help planners, practitioners, and local officials identify nature-based solutions for managing flood risk at various scales and community contexts. This webinar will include a live demonstration of the tool.

Presenter

Jacob Pederson

Jacob Pederson facilitates and staffs Floodplains for the Future, a collaborative partnership that supports multi-benefit floodplain projects in the Puyallup, White & Carbon Rivers. Hosted by Pierce County and supported by the Floodplains by Design Initiative, Floodplains for the Future includes project teams working on flood mitigation and safety, habitat restoration, landowner outreach, agricultural land conservation, and monitoring. Pederson is a Tacoma native and has master's degrees in Public Administration and Environmental and Forest Sciences from the University of Washington.

Presenter

Jill Dixon

Jill Dixon is a senior urban planner at Sasaki who enjoys working in interdisciplinary teams to tackle complex urban issues. In Boston, she was part of the Climate Ready Boston team, where she focused on social resiliency and communicating climate risks, and earlier researched the city's vulnerabilities as part of Sasaki's Sea Change project, which recently won an ASLA award for communications. Beyond Boston, her resilience work has included coastal resiliency in the Mississippi Delta and economic resiliency in Northeast Ohio and Detroit. Dixon holds a master's in urban planning from Harvard's Graduate School of Design and dual degrees in architecture and economics from Clemson University.

Presenter

Karen Sands, AICP

Karen Sands is the director of planning, research and sustainability for the Milwaukee Metropolitan Sewerage District (MMSD) where she's worked for over 15 years. With a career spanning 25-plus years, Sands has held a number of planning positions in the public and private sectors in Wisconsin, Maine, and New York. She is an Envision Sustainability Professional (ENV SP) and serves on boards of directors for the Water Quality Board of the International Joint Commission, Southeastern Wisconsin Watersheds Trust Inc., Northwest Side Community Development Corporation, and Discovery World. She is also secretary for the APA's Wisconsin Chapter.

Presenter

Katherine Hagemann

Katherine Hagemann is the resilience program manager for adaptation within the Office of Resilience at Miami-Dade County, Florida. Her work focuses primarily on climate change and adaptation to sea level rise. Before moving to Miami she also worked on coastal climate adaptation during the post-Sandy Rebuild by Design and National Disaster Resilience competitions. She earned her Master of Environmental Science from the Yale School of Forestry and Environmental Science where she studied how cities can use a hybrid of gray and green infrastructure to adapt to rising sea levels and reduce flood risks.

Presenter

Nate Woiwode

Nate Woiwode manages the Nature Conservancy's efforts to build the case for employing nature and natural systems to manage flood risk and build resilience in coastal and riverine communities across the United States. Previously, Woiwode worked for the Long Island chapter for eight years, where he helped guide many of the Conservancy's post-Sandy efforts in New York and regionally, including managing engagement in the $1 billion Rebuild by Design competition and served as a key member of the team convened by Gov. Andrew Cuomo to develop long term recommendations on how to make New York State more resilient to the impacts of climate change. He also led the Coastal Resilience Team for the Long Island Chapter and was a co-lead of the New York State Climate Change Team. Woiwode also helped craft and pass New York's Community Risk and Resilience Act and the Seagrass Protection Act as well as serving as a member of the Staff Steering Committee of the NYS Sea Level Rise Task Force.

Moderator

Jim Schwab, FAICP

Jim Schwab joined the American Planning Association in November 1985. Originally the assistant editor of Planning, APA's monthly magazine, he joined APA's research department in August 1990. He serves as the co-editor of the APA monthly publication Zoning Practice. Schwab is the manager of APA's Hazards Planning Center in the Chicago office. He was the project manager and general editor for the FEMA-funded APA Planning Advisory Report, Hazard Mitigation: Integrating Best Practices into Planning. He also served as the primary author and principal investigator for Planning for Post-Disaster Recovery: Next Generation(2014), produced by APA under a cooperative agreement with the Federal Emergency Management Agency.

Post-Disaster Temporary Housing: Urban Planning Considerations

March 23, 2017

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After large-scale disasters, the mission of temporary housing is critical. Much has changed since Katrina — one of the largest temporary housing operations in modern history: the technology to construct temporary housing, considerations for resilience, the development and use of the National Disaster Recovery Framework, and a more integrated approach to disaster recovery. Future disasters, especially in anticipation of more intense storms, may challenge us further.

Meet the Presenters

In this webinar, you will learn about: the importance of knowing where and how your community will provide temporary housing after a disaster, current federal policies that pertain to the temporary housing mission, new technologies and standards for improving resilience of temporary housing and, incorporating post-disaster housing considerations into local plans and policies.


Presenter

Shannon S. Van Zandt

Shannon Van Zandt is an Assistant Professor at Texas A&M University.

Presenter

Thomas A. Womeldurf

Thomas Womeldurf is the Director of State and Federal Programs for the Institute for Business & Technology Safety (IBTS).

Moderator

Chad Berginnis, CFM

Chad Berginnis became executive director of ASFPM in July 2012 after joining the the organization in 2011. Since 2000, he has served ASFPM as insurance committee chair, mitigation policy committees' coordinator, vice chair, and chair. Berginnis received his Bachelor of Science in natural resources from Ohio State University. Since 1993, his work has focused on floodplain management, hazard mitigation, and land-use planning at the state, local, and private sector level.

Subdivision Design and Flood Hazard Areas

December 2, 2016

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Please join three professionals as they dive into APA's new PAS Report, Subdivision Design and Flood Hazard Areas. The discussion will begin with an overview of the drivers, issues, and standards of PAS 584 by Chad Berginnis, executive director of the Association of State Floodplain Managers (ASFPM). Next, retired Licking County, Ohio, Planning Commission Director Jerry Brems will discuss local issues that planners face when dealing with design standards and flood hazard areas. Finally, Tyler Berding, founding partner of the California law firm Berding & Weil LLP will speak about the many problems homeowners associations confront when dealing with flood hazards over the long term.

Meet the Presenters

Presenter

Chad Berginnis, CFM

Chad Berginnis became executive director of ASFPM in July 2012 after joining the the organization in 2011. Since 2000, he has served ASFPM as insurance committee chair, mitigation policy committees' coordinator, vice chair, and chair. Berginnis received his Bachelor of Science in natural resources from Ohio State University. Since 1993, his work has focused on floodplain management, hazard mitigation, and land-use planning at the state, local, and private sector level.

Presenter

Jerry Brems

Jerry Brems retired from the Licking County planning commission after serving as its director for more than 19 years. During his tenure, Licking County became the first Ohio County to participate in the National Flood Insurance Program's Community Rating System. Licking County became the first “Project Impact” community in Ohio in 1998. In November 2003, Licking County's Countywide All Natural Hazards Mitigation Plan became the first multi-jurisdictional all-hazards mitigation plan approved by FEMA Region V. Prior to working for Licking County, Brems worked for the Ohio Department of Natural Resources in the Floodplain Planning Unit assisting communities participate in the NFIP and was responsible for drafting state floodplain management regulations, ultimately adopted by the Ohio Department of Administrative Services for managing state activities in flood hazard areas.

Presenter

Tyler Berding

Tyler Berding is a founding partner of Berding & Weil LLP, a California law firm that has represented over 1,500 community associations in the past 40 years and written extensively about their operations. He has drafted legislation affecting common interest developments and frequently testified before legislative committees. He served as a member of the California Department of Real Estate's Task Force on Common Interest Developments. Berding is a member of the American Bar Association Forum on the Construction Industry, the State Bar of California, and the Common Interest Development Subsection of the State Bar's Real Property Section, the Foundation for Community Association Research, and Consumer Attorneys of California. Berding has a JD from the University of California, Davis, and a MA and a PhD from Claremont Graduate University.

Moderator

Jim Schwab, FAICP

Jim Schwab joined the American Planning Association in November 1985. Originally the assistant editor of Planning, APA's monthly magazine, he joined APA's research department in August 1990. He serves as the co-editor of the APA monthly publication Zoning Practice. Schwab is the manager of APA's Hazards Planning Center in the Chicago office. He was the project manager and general editor for the FEMA-funded APA Planning Advisory Report, Hazard Mitigation: Integrating Best Practices into Planning. He also served as the primary author and principal investigator for Planning for Post-Disaster Recovery: Next Generation (2014), produced by APA under a cooperative agreement with the Federal Emergency Management Agency.

State Resiliency Initiatives: From Issue to Action!

September 22, 2016

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Two state floodplain and resilience professionals discussed how two different statewide approaches are being implemented to better enable their communities and citizens to be more resilient. The conversation focused on the drivers for these state-level initiatives, ties to planning efforts, implementation opportunities and challenges, and community level actions that have resulted.

Meet the Presenters

Presenter

William Nechamen

William “Bill” Nechamen is the state floodplain management coordinator for the New York State Department of Environmental Conservation (NYSDEC), a position he has held since 1996. He has been chief of the Floodplain Management Section in the NYSDEC Division of Water since 2001. Nechamen is a founding member and was the first chair of the New York State Floodplain and Stormwater Managers Association (NYSFSMA), currently serves as their executive director, and remains an active member. He is the immediate past chair of the Association of State Floodplain Managers.

Presenter

Iain Hyde

Iain Hyde joined the Colorado Resiliency and Recovery Office in 2014. He has nine years of professional experience in emergency management and disaster recovery. He previously worked at the Colorado Office of Emergency Management (Division of Homeland Security and Emergency Management) for five years, most recently as the recovery manager. In that role he worked closely with and provided support to local governments, state and federal agencies and non-governmental partners before, during and after disasters. Hyde has worked on a wide range of issues, including hazard mitigation, infrastructure, floodplain management, environmental restoration, economic and community development, and disaster case management. He coordinated the Colorado's long-term recovery support activities with communities which were impacted by the 2013 floods, as well as the 2012 and 2013 wildfire seasons.

Moderator

Chad Berginnis, CFM

Chad Berginnis became executive director of ASFPM in July 2012 after joining the the organization in 2011. Since 2000, he has served ASFPM as insurance committee chair, mitigation policy committees' coordinator, vice chair, and chair. Berginnis received his Bachelor of Science in natural resources from Ohio State University. Since 1993, his work has focused on floodplain management, hazard mitigation, and land-use planning at the state, local, and private sector level.

Combining Climate Adaptation and Hazard Mitigation Plans

July 7, 2016

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Two professionals, a planner, and an emergency manager discussed how and why Baltimore and Monterey County, California, decided to merge together climate adaptation and hazard mitigation plans. The discussion was centered on the basic premise of Baltimore's effort to merge its climate adaptation plan with the update of its hazard mitigation plan, issues Baltimore has experienced or will experience (e.g., increased nuisance flooding), the nature and scope of the Monterey County plan, challenges Monterey County has faced in its multijurisdictional approach, and more.

Meet the Presenters

Presenter

Kristin Baja

Kristin Baja is the climate and resilience planner with the Office of Sustainability at Baltimore City. She is responsible for development and implementation of the City's Disaster Preparedness Project and Plan (DP3) which integrates climate adaptation with hazard mitigation efforts. She is also responsible for climate change communication and outreach, Community Rating System certification, resiliency planning and STAR Communities certification. Baja is a Certified Floodplain Manager and leads the city's floodplain regulation. She is an active member of the Urban Sustainability Directors Network, Climate Communications Consortium of Maryland, American Society of Adaptation Professionals, and the Baltimore City Forestry Board. Before joining Baltimore City, Baja worked for the City of Ann Arbor developing its Climate Action Plan and Sustainability Framework. She has been involved in climate and resilience planning with various cities throughout the United States. Baja holds a Master of Urban Planning degree and a Master of Science degree from the University of Michigan.

Presenter

Sherrie Collins

Sherrie Collins is the emergency manager for Monterey County in California. She manages the Office of Emergency Services (OES) and serves under the chief administrative officer of the County. Her office is responsible for all aspects of emergency management including preparedness/ community outreach; ensuring government / public safety readiness and strengthening core capabilities through leveraging grant opportunities, training and exercise, and coordinated emergency planning. OES manages the Operational Area/County Emergency Operations Center; coordinated the multi-jurisdictional hazard mitigation planning effort between 12 cities and county and operational area strategic objectives. She is currently working on projects involving engaging the “public-private partnerships” and local community-based affinity groups in strengthening resiliency throughout the Monterey region. Her previous emergency manager assignment was with Coconino County in Northern Arizona, where she served for six years and has been involved in four state and federal declared disasters including wildland fires, major flooding events, and tornados. Collins has a BS in environmental conservation.

Moderator

Jim Schwab, FAICP

Jim Schwab joined the American Planning Association in November 1985. Originally the assistant editor of Planning, APA's monthly magazine, he joined APA's research department in August 1990. He serves as the co-editor of the APA monthly publication Zoning Practice. Schwab is the manager of APA's Hazards Planning Center in the Chicago office. He was the project manager and general editor for the FEMA-funded APA Planning Advisory Report, Hazard Mitigation: Integrating Best Practices into Planning. He also served as the primary author and principal investigator for Planning for Post-Disaster Recovery: Next Generation (2014), produced by APA under a cooperative agreement with the Federal Emergency Management Agency.

The Role of Hazard Mitigation in Post-Disaster Recovery

May 6, 2015

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As disasters become more prominent in the United States, the role of hazard mitigation is enormous in the outcome of a city's recovery effort. In this webinar, two professionals discussed the importance of hazard mitigation and the role it plays in the post-disaster recovery effort.

Meet the Presenters

Eugene Henry, AICP
Presenter

Eugene Henry, AICP, CFM

Eugene Henry is a certified floodplain manager with the Association of State Floodplain Managers. Since 1983, he has worked in the public and private sectors in floodplain administration, comprehensive planning, and emergency management. His experience includes administration of programs in areas of hazard mitigation and floodplain management, post-disaster redevelopment planning, permitting and construction, land-use allocation, capital improvements programming, and large-scale developments. He has worked in implementing a 911-addressing program, served on disaster-assessment teams, and implemented components of a comprehensive emergency management plan.

Allison Boyd, AICP
Presenter

Allison Boyd, AICP

Allison Boyd specializes in planning for disaster resilience and community sustainability. Currently, Boyd coordinates hazard mitigation and continuity of operations programs for Multnomah County, Oregon. Prior to moving to the Pacific Northwest, she developed recovery and mitigation plans for communities and managed the Post-Disaster Redevelopment Planning Initiative in Florida. She is a contributing author to Planning for Post-Disaster Recovery: Next Generation. Boyd's professional experience includes climate change adaptation, wildfire protection planning, comprehensive and environmental planning, emergency management, and business continuity.

Moderator

Jim Schwab, FAICP

Jim Schwab joined the American Planning Association in November 1985. Originally the assistant editor of Planning, APA's monthly magazine, he joined APA's research department in August 1990. He serves as the co-editor of the APA monthly publication Zoning Practice. Schwab is the manager of APA's Hazards Planning Center in the Chicago office. He was the project manager and general editor for the FEMA-funded APA Planning Advisory Report, Hazard Mitigation: Integrating Best Practices into Planning. He also served as the primary author and principal investigator for Planning for Post-Disaster Recovery: Next Generation (2014), produced by APA under a cooperative agreement with the Federal Emergency Management Agency.